Of interest to Students

2015 Summer Interns and Volunteers

We at LINGUIST List are delighted this summer to open our doors to the 2015 Summer Interns! If you are interested in becoming an intern, be on the look-out for our application cycle to open again next spring. In the mean time, there are other ways to get involved here at LINGUIST List. Just contact us for more information.

Take a look below to meet the newest members of the LINGUIST List:

Seyed Asghari

Seyed Amir Hossein Asghari is a doctoral candidate in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of Indiana, Bloomington. He has been the project manager for the first Persian-Albanian Dictionary (2010) and co-author of Persian-Albania and English conversation (2008).

He is currently working at Baharli South Azeri Turkish of Iran at Linguistic List.

Zac Branson

blog_pic

Zac recently completed his second year in the PhD program in the Department of Linguistics at Indiana University. He is pursuing coursework for an M.A. in Linguistics and an M.S. in Computational Linguistics. Zac’s research interests include the documentation of understudied and endangered languages, and the development of computational tools to aid such documentation.

Jacob Henry

Jacob is currently an intern at the LINGUIST List for summer 2015. His main projects include the relaunch of the LL-Map website as well as assisting with the launch of the GORILLA site. He’s originally from Muncie, Indiana and in 2011 he became a student at the University of Oklahoma where he’s currently pursuing a BA in French and General Linguistics. His particular academic interests lie in sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, and typology. He has also done research in various periods of French literature, as well as interning in a microbiology lab.

Umida Khikmatillaeva

Umida started volunteering for the Linguist List in the Spring of 2015. During 2012-2014 she worked at IU for the Turkish Flagship Program; her task was creating Turkish to Uzbek Bridge project materials. Prior to this program, she worked at the Center for Turkic and Iranian Lexicography and Dialectology (CTILD). Together with her colleagues, they created an Uzbek-English online dictionary. She has been working for IU since 1996 and taught Intermediate level Uzbek at Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European and Central Asian Languages (SWEESL) till 2003, then she coordinated Advanced Uzbek Program (Summer Overseas Program) in Samarkand in 2004.

 

Levi King

Levi joined LINGUIST List as a volunteer for the summer of 2015, where he’s contributing to the GORILLA project and related speech recognition work. He’s currently a Ph.D. student in Computational Linguistics (CL) at Indiana University, where he previously got a dual M.A. in CL (Department of Linguistics) and Applied Linguistics & TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages; Department of Second Language Studies). While his CL interests run the gamut, he’s particularly interested in applying natural language processing to the automatic content analysis of non-native speaker language, and more broadly, the analysis of “noisy” language data in general. In his free time, he enjoys live music, board and video games, trivia, pottery and comic books.

Alec Wolyniec

Photo on 6-22-15 at 7.20 PM #2

Alec is an intern at the LINGUIST List for the summer of 2015. His work includes assisting with the development of the LL-Map website, updating databases to be used in the development of Automatic Speech Recognition technologies, and creating algorithms to scrape language data from Wiktionary and other websites. Originally from the suburbs of New York City, he is currently a student at Emory University in Atlanta, where he is pursuing a BS in Computer Science and a secondary major in Linguistics. In his spare time, Alec enjoys jazz music, reading, basketball, and board games.

What Makes LINGUIST List So Special?

Dear LINGUIST List Subscribers, Readers, Users, and Followers,

There are many very important and interesting moderated lists for linguists on the internet that allow you to quickly post some information about a conference, a job opening, a new version of some software, or a question related to some issue. All list moderators check whether the submitted message is relevant for the particular audience before they approve its dissemination. We at LINGUIST List check whether the message would be relevant for the GLOBAL linguistic community, independent of a specific linguistic domain or sub-field.

We at LINGUIST List believe that it is in your interest to have all submissions double-checked and approved, links to pages checked, content edited to avoid embarrassment for the author or the readers. We believe that having human editors, and not just moderators, serves all of us best in a professional and academic environment.

LINGUIST List is the only such service that provides moderation and careful editing of submissions—for linguists, by linguists.

We believe that checking publisher’s announcements or conference calls is in the interest of all of us to make sure that these announcements are serious and not predatory. We check every announcement by a publisher or a conference organizer. We verify the address and website, check whether it is blacklisted in common registries of predatory publishers, and send feedback to these registries, if we identify a predatory publisher.

We also believe that the information that you submit should not be just sent out and forgotten. We help you by adding information to clarify your posts, to change details, extend deadlines, add programs to your conference calls, or close a job advertisement. Our editors receive on average five such requests each per day, to change some announcement, correct settings in an EasyAbs review setting, to change deadlines, contact emails, or language and linguistic specializations.

We believe that this is necessary to reduce the time our subscribers waste with irrelevant information—to improve the information quality that we disseminate over LINGUIST List.

We know that over the last 25 years LINGUIST List has served many of you worldwide. It has brought us linguists together, helped us to find a job, let us know about new books and dissertations, workshops and conferences all over the globe. We are aware that things have changed, that our mailboxes are flooded with incredible amounts of information, that there are so many websites that provide linguistic information, that social media is changing the way we use the internet for communication. We are constantly improving our technologies and services to focus on our mission:

To provide free information and services to all linguists, readers and subscribers worldwide.

We believe that linguistics needs such an information hub that is independent, user-funded, international, and that integrates all linguistic sub-fields, not specializing on a single research area or domain. LINGUIST is truly international and multilingual, run by a team of linguists from Asia, Europe, and America. It is run by a team of volunteers, student editors and faculty, all linguists from different subfields, with different linguistic and language backgrounds.

During Fund Drive 2015, you can support LINGUIST List with a donation:

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

We all appreciate your support, and when we say “we all,” we mean the global international community of linguists and language lovers.

Sincerely,

Your LINGUIST Team

 

Startling Allegations Rock Historical Linguistics Community

BLOOMINGTON, Indiana – It has been an exciting week for the Indo-Europeanist community. While Monday saw the announcement of Bob’s Law, which derives the modern English Pez dispenser from the Proto-Indo-European *pesd-, today’s news marks a more controversial chapter.

Recently uncovered documents suggest Jacob Grimm may have forged evidence to support some of his theories.

“We now suspect that the entire Tocharian branch may have been invented by Grimm to further his career and possibly to impress women,” Professor Schmaltz, a noted figurehead in such matters, explained. “After all, we’ve had tremendous difficulty deriving the word yakup in Tocharian A that is claimed to correspond to PIE *deiwos.”

At a press conference held earlier this morning Schmaltz also cited accounts of Grimm’s character by some of his contemporaries:

Karl Verner wrote of Grimm, “Jacob was there at the onset establishing sound change rules. He worked tirelessly, never stopping and never shifting his opinion.” More damning is a letter written by Hermann Grassmann after Grimm’s death stating, “When I first met him, he had two aspirations: academic rigor and a drive to become famous. As he got older it seems the first gave way to the second.”

Scholars point to sloppy forgeries like this tablet as proof of Grimm's misconduct (via Wikimedia).

Scholars point to sloppy forgeries like this tablet as proof of Grimm’s misconduct (via Wikimedia).

This new theory, unveiled at the ongoing Construction of Reconstructed Languages conference, may be supported by work of folklorist Professor Jones of the Totally Legit School of Language Studies.

Jones notes that a hidden confession may be found in the classic fairy tale The Two Beans, or Zwei Bohnen, die verbrüdert sind, diskutieren die moralischen Implikationen des Fälschens historischer Dokumente, um die Karriere einer der Bohnen zu fördern, one of many collected by Jacob Grimm and his brother Wilhelm.

The text may have gone unnoticed by researchers this long for two main reasons. First, the bean that likely represents Jacob Grimm, has consistently been mistranslated into English as Jacob Melancholy the Bean, instead of Jacob Grimm the Bean. Second, as Jones points out, the relative dearth of violence in The Two Beans has diminished its popularity.

“Of course, as with any Grimms’ Fairy Tale, there is a fair amount of unnecessary violence, but in The Two Beans, the focus is Jacob the Bean’s monologue in which he takes responsibility for gross academic misconduct.”

In response to these allegations, Thomas Grimm, a descendant of Jacob Grimm, announced he had recently discovered a box full of his ancestor’s documents indicating both his innocence and access to a modern-day word processor and printer.

Donate Today and Enter to Win a One-Year Journal Subscription from Elsevier!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers:

It is that time of year again, fellow linguists. Today, LINGUIST List is kicking off our 2015 Fund Drive, where we ask you for donations. However, we try to make it worth your while. If you donate during Fund Drive, you can be entered to win many fantastic prizes generously donated by our Supporting Publishers (for a full list, visit this link: http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/supporters/). These prizes will be offered for the duration of Fund Drive this year, and there will be many competitions and drawings to come. So, stay tuned and don’t miss the opportunity to win these valuable linguistic materials.

Now, for our first prize of Fund Drive 2015!

Elsevier is offering a five one-year personal subscriptions to the Elsevier linguistics journal of the winners’ choice. That’s right, if you donate today, five of you can win a one-year subscription to one of Elsevier’s linguistics journals.

These journal subscriptions, normally priced anywhere between $70-$300 USD can be yours. If you donate at least $50 USD, your name will be entered to win a one-year subscription to your choice of one of these journals:

Assessing Writing
Computers and Composition
Discourse, Context & Media
English for Specific Purposes
Journal of Communication Disorders
Journal of English for Academic Purposes
Journal of Fluency Disorders
Journal of Phonetics
Journal of Pragmatics
Journal of Second Language Writing
Language and Communication
Language Sciences
Lingua
Linguistics and Education
System

Donate any time between now and tomorrow night at midnight (Tuesday March 10th, 11:59 EST), and get your name in the drawing to win a one-year subscription to one of Elsevier’s fantastic linguistic journals of your choice.

You can enter your name into the drawing by donating at the link below.

funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate

Again, keep an eye out for more competitions and publisher raffles as our Fund Drive progresses. If you miss today’s raffle, there will be many more great prizes from our supporting publishers this year, so stay tuned to our social media pages to hear about more prizes that you can win.

Thanks and good luck!

Sincerely,
The LINGUIST List Crew

Changes at LINGUIST List

Dear linguists,

We have some news to announce.

The LINGUIST List is moving.

This will not affect the website or mailing lists. The postal address is changing, as well as our phone and fax numbers.

The new fax and phone numbers are active:

phone: +1 812 391-3602
fax: +1 888 908-2629

The phone-line now provides a voice mailbox. You can leave us a message outside of common office hours (8 AM to 6 PM, Eastern Time). You can also text us to this number.

The new mailing address is from end of June 2014 only:

The LINGUIST List
Department of Linguistics
Indiana University
Memorial Hall 322
1021 E. 3rd Street
Bloomington, IN 47405-7005
United States

You can send all LINGUIST List related mail to this new address already now. From June on you should only use this new address.

Please update your address books.

The LINGUIST List has also a second moderator. Malgorzata E. Cavar is serving LINGUIST for a while now and has been nominated as a new co-moderator by the board of the eLinguistics Foundation end of May 2014.

 

Sincerely

The LINGUIST List Team!

Step right up and donate for your chance to win from Wiley Publishing!

Hello Readers!

Thanks to the recent donation from Wiley Publishing, we are able to give away not one, not two, but THREE books!

  1. Bhatia and Ritchie / The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, hardback, published Dec 2012 (was just honored as a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title!) 
  2. Sidnell / The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, pub Nov 2012 (bestselling reference work)
  3. The Handbook of Chinese Linguistics, JUST PUBLISHED, April 2014 

We will randomly choose a name from donations that we receive from today through 11:59 PM EST on Wednesday (April 30, 2014). Make sure to DONATE TODAY and show your support for both your university and your favorite linguistic field by associating your donations!

Got an abstract? There are 218 conferences awaiting your submission.

Think about it: in your career, how many conferences have you gone to? How many have you presented at? How many abstracts have you submitted for papers, talks, poster sessions, panels, and colloquia?

And of those, how many did you find out about through the LINGUIST List?

An academic’s need to attend and present at conferences, and the inherently chaotic nature of the academic conference system, is precisely what makes the Calls and Conferences feature of the LINGUIST List such an indispensable tool. Rather than relying on word of mouth or hoping that your colleagues will remember to CC you on an email, you can count on LINGUIST to keep you informed about your field’s most important conference and the associated call for papers.

But we do far more than just email you this important information: we also have a searchable database of all upcoming linguistic conferences (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/browse-current.cfm?type=Conf) and all active calls for papers (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/browse-current.cfm?type=call). We also have an events calendar to keep you organized (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/eventcalendar.cfm), so you’ll never have to present in Germany one day and Japan the next.

If you’re a conference organizer, you probably know how much easier it is to submit a conference announcement, program, and call for papers via LINGUIST than to email your colleagues one by one. You also know that we circulate your submission within 48 hours. But did you know that we provide a free, user-friendly platform (http://linguistlist.org/confservices/EasyAbs/index.cfm) for your participants to submit abstracts? Or that we’re developing an online registration service (http://linguistlist.org/confservices/EasyReg/index.cfm) to bring your attendees to you, minus the headaches?

As of this week, the LINGUIST List has records for 787 conferences taking place all over the world between now and September 2015, with 218 active calls for papers. And these aren’t just English: we distribute announcements in French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and, once, even Papiamento!

We do all this for the sake of the linguistic community at no cost to you, which means we rely solely upon the generosity of our supporters. If you have found these services valuable, please donate to the LINGUIST List today.

http://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm.

Without your donation, we can’t continue to provide our Calls and Conferences services that you, as an academic, rely on. We’re counting on you!

With sincerest gratitude,

Bryn Hauk, Xiyan Wang & Anna White
Calls & Conferences Editors

Making the Most of LINGUIST: Additional and Special Interest Resources

Some LINGUIST resources aren’t so easy to classify. In this last letter, we’ve grouped some of the lesser-known features that may be of interest to you.

LINGUIST has established a presence on a variety of social networking sites. Connect with us by clicking the links below:

Various linguistic resources can only be found on the World Wide Web. Luckily, LINGUIST has an area for that!

  • Web Resources/Software: This area of the LINGUIST List contains links to websites and software devoted to natural and constructed languages, to writing systems, and to language resources on the web (such as dictionaries).
  • FYI: As mentioned in our previous letter, the FYI area contains information that doesn’t neatly fit into any single LINGUIST posting topic, such as calls for book chapters, award recipient announcements, new journal editor announcements, scholarship announcements, etc.
  • Discussion: The Discussion area is one of LINGUIST’s best kept secrets (but we’d like it to be not-so-secret). Discussions posted on the LINGUIST site have spawned many publications, collaborations, and thought-provoking linguistic observations and ponderings. Join the discussion!
  • Mailing Lists: There are a number of mailing lists linked in here that are related to different facets of linguistics and language.

LINGUIST’s projects also cater to various linguistic interests.

  • Tutorials: These tutorials were designed by programmers to help train linguistics students for work at LINGUIST. They’re very helpful introductions (or, for some of you, refreshers) for the technical work linguists engage in.
  • Linguistic Blogs: Here you can see what linguists on the web have to say about language:
  • Learning Languages Other than English: These resources will help you find language learning resources.
  • English Language Learning (EFL/ESL): LINGUIST also contains a variety of resources for learning English.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this Making the Most of LINGUIST letter series! As always, if you have any questions about the services LINGUIST offers its readers and subscribers, don’t hesitate to ask.

Today’s Prize is Up to Spec(Gram)! Donate to Win!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

Today we’re proud to offer a prize from the first, foremost, and possibly only publisher of satirical linguistics: Speculative Grammarian! If you donate before 11:59 p.m. today, you could be one of 5 lucky winners to walk away with a SpecGram prize package, which includes a copy of The Speculative Grammarian Essential Guide to Linguistics, as well as a SpecGram magnet or poster!

You can read the description for this must have volume at the URL below (and if you happen to pay money for a book you may win for free anyway while you’re there, I’m sure the good folks at SpecGram won’t complain):

http://specgram.com/SGEGL/

Remember, to win, you need to donate today!

http://linguistlist.org/donation/

And don’t forget, LINGUIST List also has many great premiums we’d love to send you if you donate $35 or more!

http://linguistlist.org/fund-drive/2014/premiums.php

Good luck!

The LINGUIST List Crew

New Evidence for Neanderthal Language Announced

YPSILANTI, Michigan – The controversy over whether Neanderthals possessed a capacity for language may have been resolved. After years of speculation by evolutionary anthropologists and geneticists, a group of linguists has announced today that they have uncovered written evidence proving the Neanderthal capacity for language.

“Neanderthal man was able to express his ideas about the world around him, but was restricted by his limited syntax,” Professor Schmaltz explained at today’s press conference. “Whereas modern man combines words hierarchically into structure, the Neanderthal could only concatenate them linearly.”

It seems that Neanderthals had a single syllable oog, which, when repeated, formed different words. oog has been translated as ‘Oog’ a proper name, oog.oog meant ‘two people named Oog,’ oog.oog.oog meant ‘emotionally distant – like a teenager anxious to move out of his parents’ cave’ and so on.

Schmaltz’ team was able to identify and translate two texts left by Neanderthals. The first, a recent discovery in Spain, is a fragment of a teenager’s diary. It reads oog.oog.oog and has been translated as ‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’.

‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’

oog.oog.oog

The second text is either an exhaustive history of the region or simply the Neanderthal word for ‘antelope’, oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

These findings suggest Neanderthals were just as culturally sophisticated as modern humans, but totally lacked an efficient method of communication. It has long been known that while Homo Sapiens’ culture developed rapidly, Neanderthals stagnated over thousands of years. Schmaltz hypothesizes that innovations simply would have taken too long to explain, as new words would have to be even longer chains of oog’s.

Schmaltz went on to speculate that the high-five traces its origins back to a borrowing from Proto-Neanderthal. “With each hand representing the name ‘Oog,’ slapping them together must have been used as a greeting. It truly was the original instant message.”