Projects

Projects hosted by The LINGUIST List

Making the Most of LINGUIST: Additional and Special Interest Resources

Some LINGUIST resources aren’t so easy to classify. In this last letter, we’ve grouped some of the lesser-known features that may be of interest to you.

LINGUIST has established a presence on a variety of social networking sites. Connect with us by clicking the links below:

Various linguistic resources can only be found on the World Wide Web. Luckily, LINGUIST has an area for that!

  • Web Resources/Software: This area of the LINGUIST List contains links to websites and software devoted to natural and constructed languages, to writing systems, and to language resources on the web (such as dictionaries).
  • FYI: As mentioned in our previous letter, the FYI area contains information that doesn’t neatly fit into any single LINGUIST posting topic, such as calls for book chapters, award recipient announcements, new journal editor announcements, scholarship announcements, etc.
  • Discussion: The Discussion area is one of LINGUIST’s best kept secrets (but we’d like it to be not-so-secret). Discussions posted on the LINGUIST site have spawned many publications, collaborations, and thought-provoking linguistic observations and ponderings. Join the discussion!
  • Mailing Lists: There are a number of mailing lists linked in here that are related to different facets of linguistics and language.

LINGUIST’s projects also cater to various linguistic interests.

  • Tutorials: These tutorials were designed by programmers to help train linguistics students for work at LINGUIST. They’re very helpful introductions (or, for some of you, refreshers) for the technical work linguists engage in.
  • Linguistic Blogs: Here you can see what linguists on the web have to say about language:
  • Learning Languages Other than English: These resources will help you find language learning resources.
  • English Language Learning (EFL/ESL): LINGUIST also contains a variety of resources for learning English.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this Making the Most of LINGUIST letter series! As always, if you have any questions about the services LINGUIST offers its readers and subscribers, don’t hesitate to ask.

New Evidence for Neanderthal Language Announced

YPSILANTI, Michigan – The controversy over whether Neanderthals possessed a capacity for language may have been resolved. After years of speculation by evolutionary anthropologists and geneticists, a group of linguists has announced today that they have uncovered written evidence proving the Neanderthal capacity for language.

“Neanderthal man was able to express his ideas about the world around him, but was restricted by his limited syntax,” Professor Schmaltz explained at today’s press conference. “Whereas modern man combines words hierarchically into structure, the Neanderthal could only concatenate them linearly.”

It seems that Neanderthals had a single syllable oog, which, when repeated, formed different words. oog has been translated as ‘Oog’ a proper name, oog.oog meant ‘two people named Oog,’ oog.oog.oog meant ‘emotionally distant – like a teenager anxious to move out of his parents’ cave’ and so on.

Schmaltz’ team was able to identify and translate two texts left by Neanderthals. The first, a recent discovery in Spain, is a fragment of a teenager’s diary. It reads oog.oog.oog and has been translated as ‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’.

‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’

oog.oog.oog

 

The second text is either an exhaustive history of the region or simply the Neanderthal word for ‘antelope’, oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

 

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

 

These findings suggest Neanderthals were just as culturally sophisticated as modern humans, but totally lacked an efficient method of communication. It has long been known that while Homo Sapiens’ culture developed rapidly, Neanderthals stagnated over thousands of years. Schmaltz hypothesizes that innovations simply would have taken too long to explain, as new words would have to be even longer chains of oog’s.

Schmaltz went on to speculate that the high-five traces its origins back to a borrowing from Proto-Neanderthal. “With each hand representing the name ‘Oog,’ slapping them together must have been used as a greeting. It truly was the original instant message.”

 

LINGUIST: A Non-Profit Service for Linguists

Dear Subscribers,

I came from Shanghai, China and I am so happy that I have joined the LINGUIST team over the past six years. I really appreciate the LINGUIST List for giving me this job opportunity. Right now I can support my family, raise my kid, and learn a lot of new things from different projects.

As a full time programmer for LINGUIST, I have been involved in many different projects. This year I am mainly involved in two projects: LEGO and EasyReg. For the LEGO project, we have uploaded 31 lexicons and we will upload more lexicons and more than 3000 word lists into our system. Then the user can search all the data in these lexicons and word lists through our faceted search facility. The EasyReg facility was launched a few months ago. The EasyReg system will help conference organizer to set up online registration system easily and let registrants submit and pay registration fee online through their customized registration system.

Also I help to maintain the publisher, finance and EasyAbs web sites.

LINGUIST is non-profit organization. It provides free service for all linguist users in the world. Your donations – even a small amount – will mean a lot for us. Your contribution will help us to continually run another year to provide more service for linguist users and gave us the chance to work here.

Please help us to donate at:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Thanks again for your continued support and donations!

Yours sincerely,
Li (Lily) Zheng
LINGUIST Programmer

LINGUIST: Supporting Linguistics Internationally

Dear subscribers,

I am Xiyan Wang from China. I graduated with my M.A. in Linguistics in April 2013 and continued my editing work at LINGUIST List until now. In addition to the data and tools for scholars in their research and field work, LINGUIST List provides the unique resources and information for the whole linguistic community.

Please donate so that our service for all the users and the linguistic community could continue:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Since last summer I have been working with other crew members on Calls & Conferences, Institutions & Programs and LL-Map. Through Calls & Conferences services, users can announce conferences and find conferences relevant to their interests. Institutions & Programs provide information on institutions and programs that specialize in particular languages or fields of study for students and faculty. LL-MAP not only helps the user with dynamic search for language data, it also gives scholars the opportunity to utilize our site for the creation of their own language maps.

The idea of keeping the resources and services free and easy to access for scholars, students and all users is deeply held in LINGUIST List. However, we could not fully achieve these goals without your generous donation every year. I have been working at LINGUIST List as an international student for about two and a half years. I have always been grateful to this organization’s support with which I finished my MA study and graduated last April. The study and work here is already part of treasure in my life that I will never forget. Your support and donation has always been very significant to assist the many international graduate students like me and help us continue our efforts of providing better services to the linguistic community. Even a small sum of money will be valuable to LINGUIST List and eventually all the users benefit from your generous donations. We need your help, please donate with just one click:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Sincerely,
Xiyan Wang

Making the Most of LINGUIST: Resources for Research

As a researcher, there are a lot of ways to formulate research questions and gather linguistic data. LINGUIST offers several features you can use to reach out to the linguistics community as you conduct your research.

  • Queries: You can submit research surveys, tests, and ask for resources relevant to your research here:

If you think someone may have already asked a similar question, check out Summaries to see if our readers have provided a response.

For general research needs, LINGUIST features a Publications Area where you can find bibliographic resources:

In this area, you can find:

If you’re doing language documentation research or your research is more technical in nature, you should visit our

for technical tips.

In fact, all of our projects can be used to gather information, and generate and support language hypotheses:

So once you’ve finished your research, how can you use LINGUIST to make the most of your career? Stay tuned for the next letter on LINGUIST’s resources for professional development.

Remember, these services are available to the linguistic community by your donations. To help us keep these services available in the future, remember to donate and help support.

LINGUIST: A Hub for Open and Free Services

Dear LINGUIST List Subscribers,

My name is Andrew Lamont. I’m a student editor at the LINGUIST List. I came to the LINGUIST List last January to volunteer on LL-MAP and MultiTree. Prior to this exposure, I had only dreamt of such a central hub of linguistic resources as accessible and open as these. As I began delving deeper into the treasure trove of the LINGUIST List, I came to realize what an incredible resource our community has.

The time I spend supporting the LINGUIST List has been one of the most valuable experiences of my working life as a tyro linguist. Not only am I working towards goals shared by the entire community, but my time here enables me to pursue graduate studies, pursuing my own academic goals. Like many of you, I depend on the LINGUIST List.

Here in the office, I work on announcements of publications, act as a listserv administrator, and run the tech team. Like everyone else here who works hard to keep the LINGUIST List running smoothly, I know the LINGUIST List depends on me.

The LINGUIST List also depends on our subscribers for their support. While we in the office keep everything running smoothly, you keep everything running. I hope you’ll take the time to consider supporting this vital resource we all benefit from.

Please visit the link below to read more about this year’s fund drive and to make a donation.

http://linguistlist.org/donation

Thank You,

Andrew Lamont
LINGUIST List

LINGUIST: A Guide to Linguistic Resources

Dear LINGUIST List Subscribers,

As the Managing Editor, one of the most valuable lessons I’ve gained is how to guide linguists to resources that are relevant to their needs. The LINGUIST List has the ability to provide a multitude of features to the linguistic community without requiring a subscription fee. Without this fee to provide our services to the entire community, we rely on your donations to keep our services available to everyone. Please consider donating again so we can continue to offer the latest resources in linguistics:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

I started working at The LINGUIST List as a volunteer in September 2011 simply because I wanted to gain some experience in linguistics and network within the linguistic community. It turned out that later I was offered a position as a student worker, then as a graduate assistant, and now, as the managing editor. I know that I would not have been offered these opportunities had it not been for your donations in past fund drives.

During this past year, our office has been able to work in redesigning project websites. Most recently we were able to release a beta-edition of MultiTree (http://ltl.emich.edu/multitree) and have been able to begin the infrastructure for the new LINGUIST List website! We are excited to be working on this and we are relying on your donations more than ever to allow us to show results from our current and future staff.

If you donate today, you will ensure that our services for the linguistic community will continue, as well as support the work of students like myself. I greatly appreciate any donations that ensure more students will have the same opportunities that I had.

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Thank you so much for your generosity!

Sarah Fox
Managing Editor
The LINGUIST List

LINGUIST List: Networking for Linguistics

Dear Fellow Linguist,

Hi, I’m Bryn. If you have ever donated to the LINGUIST List, you are the reason that I was able to complete an exciting and enriching internship at the LINGUIST List this summer. If you have yet to donate, you have the opportunity now to help fund my work and the pursuit of my MA in Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University, while I continue serving you as a LINGUIST List student editor and team member of the Catalogue of Endangered Languages (ELCat).

Ever since I earned my BA in Linguistics and Russian Language & Literature from the University of Michigan in 2011, I have been compelled by the wildly idealistic passion to rescue endangered languages, or at least to document them for the advancement of the science. Beginning with a summer internship, the LINGUIST List has focused my energy on ELCat, one of our many projects desgined for the benefit of the linguistic community. The goal of ELCat is to assemble research on endangered languages into one up-to-date, vetted, searchable resource, which is now live at www.endangeredlanguages.com. My job is to find the best information on endangered languages and bring it to you, which has cultivated in me the important scholarly skills of resource retrieval, fast but thorough processing of linguistic literature, and bibliography management.

More than just an enthusiastic ELCat team member, I am also your editor for conference calls for papers at the LINGUIST List. That’s right: I am the one who makes sure you know that the deadline to submit to your field’s biggest conference is fast approaching, that your abstract must be no longer than 500 words, and that your submission will be rejected outright if it’s anything but a hyper-anonymized PDF with exact-to-the-milimeter margins. If you have ever submitted a conference to the mailing list, you might remember me as the one who triple-checked your spelling and painstakingly formatted your submission, who emailed you at 6 a.m. Sunday morning when you need to change your deadline, or who distributed your appel à communications in three more languages than I can personally speak.

As a linguist, I am incredibly grateful to be part of a discipline with such a well-established infrastructure to help us navigate the labyrinth of academia. Not every field has a resource like the LINGUIST List. You would be surprised how many calls for papers I have to reject for lack of linguistic relevance: submissions pertaining to economics, business, and ecology, submitted to LINGUIST for lack of a better way to distribute their announcements among their own colleagues. Our linguistics network is a great source of pride for me and, I hope, a great service to you.

If you believe in the service we provide, or if you just want to make sure graduate students like me continue to receive their stipend checks, please follow this link and donate to the LINGUIST List:

http://linguistlist.org/donation/

Sincerely,

Bryn Hauk
Calls & Conferences Editor
ELP/ELCat Team Member
The LINGUIST List

LINGUIST List: A Global Community

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

I am Lwin Moe, a programmer here at LINGUIST List. I am originally from Burma, also known as Myanmar. I came to work at LINGUIST List as an intern a few summers ago, and came back as a programmer after graduating from Indiana University. Before I tell you more about what I do at LINGUIST List, here is a link to donate if you will:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

I am a co-administrator for LISTSERV software, where LINGUIST List is hosted. I also create tools and programs for LINGUIST List crews to do their day-to-day tasks for posting. Last year, we built data entry tools for the Endangered Languages Catalogue project. We exported the data to Endangered Languages Project website at endangeredlanguages.com. I now maintain the website after LINGUIST List was tasked with updating it.

I was able to become a part of the LINGUIST List crew because of your support last year. I would like to take this opportunity to request a small donation from you to support what we do here. We would not be able to provide the linguistics community with the resources if it were not for your generous support. Here is the link to donate if you decide to do so:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Thank you,
Lwin Moe

The LINGUIST List Team Thanks Our Supporters in Poland!

Cześć! Here at LINGUIST List, we have a very multilingual crew, and today LL Associate Project Manager and MultiTree team leader Małgosia Ćavar writes to us in Polish, her native language. For our Polish subscribers out there, enjoy!

Drodzy koledzy,

wszyscy znają LINGUIST List, również w Polsce. Wiemy, że wielu Polaków korzysta z LINGUIST List. Co miesiąc nasze strony są otwierane 10-11 tysięcy razy z polskich domen. Wszyscy wiedzą, co LINGUIST List oferuje. Nasi użytkownicy szukają u nas informacji o konferencjach, letnich szkołach, ogłoszeń o pracy, nowych publikacji z językoznawsta, oraz recenzji książek. Dla przyszłych studentów mamy rejestry organizacji, szkół i programów z językoznawstwa. Dla organizatorów konferencji stworzyliśmy EasyReg, system do “obsługi” abstraktów konferencyjnych. Ask-A-Linguist jest źródłem informacji dla laików zainteresowanych językoznawstem. Nasz zespół pracuje też w projektach związanych z LINGUIST List – MultiTree, którego jestem managerem, LEGO, czy LL-Map. Nie wszyscy natomiast wiedzą, jak LINGUIST List funkcjonuje.

Jesteśmy organizacją non-profit, która nie ma oficjalnych sponsorów i żyje z datków użytkowników. Donacje na rzecz LINGUIST List przeznaczane są wyłącznie na czesne i minimalne pensje dla naszych studentów-redaktorów. Przez ponad 20 lat działalności międzynarodowa społeczność językoznawców korzystając z tego, co LINGUIST List oferuje, jednocześnie wsparła w ten sposób ponad 90 studentów językoznawstwa. W tym roku LINGUIST List po raz dwudziesty trzeci zbiera pieniądze na stypendia dla swoich redaktorów. Nawet małe donacje 5-10 dolarów mają dla nas znaczenie. W obecnej chwili jesteśmy jeszcze daleko od sumy, która zapewniłaby nam spokojne funkcjonowanie w najbliższych miesiącach. Do tego, żeby kontynuować normalną działalność potrzebujemy Waszego wsparcia.

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Serdecznie dziękuję w imieniu całego zespołu LINGUIST List.

Małgosia Ćavar