LL-MAP

LL-MAP Featured Map Collection: Yup’ik Dialect Atlas and Study

The LL-MAP team digitized a collection of 157 maps on the Yup’ik dialect in Alaska courtesy of a grant (Integrating Cartographic Elements: Creating Resources Emphasizing Arctic Materials; #0952335) from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In this collection, Jacobson (1998) mapped dialectal differences from surveys that were completed by bilingual teachers in 61 out of 68 Yup’ik villages.

Each map contains a legend that tells how often each term is used in the 61 Yup’ik villages. For instance, below we can see one map that compares Cottonwood and Balsam Poplar against each other. From this we can see that some villages will use both interchangeably, while others will use one term exclusively.

Map of the variations for “COTTONWOOD,” BALSAM POPLAR in Yup’ik

Want to use LL-MAP images in your papers or work? We have a feature that allows you to download or print maps for your own use. Simply click the print button under the “Map Viewer Option” and adjust the size of the image you want to print. Our maps can be freely used under the Creative Commons 3.0 Unported license. You are welcome to use any of our maps as long as LL-MAP is cited as the digital source; however, since most of our maps are digitized from original images, it will also be necessary to cite the original sources, if they exist. Additionally, you may need to contact the original authors as well depending on the map.

“COTTONWOOD,” BALSAM POPLAR

“DOG” OR CHUM SALMON

“JACKRABBIT,” ARCTIC HARE

“MOUSE,” VOLE

“RABBIT”, SNOWSHOE HARE

“SALMON BERRY”, CLOUDBERRY

(BEING) HAPPY

(BEING) SICK

(BEING) SLEEPY

(HE IS) CRYING

(HE MAY BE TRYING TO) DO SOMETHING AGAIN

(HE) ASKS HER TO ENTER

(HE) CAUGHT FISH

(HE) ISN’T AROUND

(HE) KEEPS BEING SAD

(IN THE EXTENDED AREA) OUT THERE

(IT IS) SMALL

(RIVER) OTTER

(STRAIGHT) KNIFE

AXE

BARREL

BEARDED SEAL

BECAUSE I LEFT

BIG TOE

BLACKFISH

BOAT

BONE

BREAD

BUCKET

BUMBLE BEE

CANADA GOOSE

CHEWING GUM

CIGARETTE

CLIFF, RIVER BANK

COAT

CONVERSING

COOKING IT

CRANE

CROSSING IT

CROWBERRY

CUTTING FISH FOR DRYING

DAY AFTER TOMORROW

DEVICE FOR SLEEPING

DOG HARNESS

DON’T GO OUT (NOW)!

EGG

EIGHT

ELBOW

ELEVATED CACHE

EYELASH

FIGURINE, SMALL DOLL

FISH EGG, ROE

FISH SCALE

FISH HOOK

FOREHEAD

FORGETTING IT

FORTY

GRANDCHILD

GRANDMOTHER

GRASS

HAND

HE GOT BIT BY A DOG

HEAD

HEART

HELPING HIM

HEY YOU, WHAT ARE YOU DOING?

HORSE

HOUSEFLY

HOW MANY

HUMPBACK SALMON

I ALSO TALKED ABOUT THEM

I ATE IT

I DON’T LOVE HIM

ICE

IT IS UP ABOVE THERE

IT WILL SPILL

JUMPING

KASS’AQ (MEANING)

KNEE

LAMP, LIGHT

LAUGHING

LET’S LEAVE

LOUSE

MAGGOT, GRUB

MAQIVIK (PRONUNCIATION)

MATCH

MIDDLE FINGER

MILK

MITTEN

MOON

MOSQUITO

MOTHER

MUSKRAT

MY HOUSE & ITS WATER

OAR

OLDER SISTER

ONE HUNDRED

OUTBOARD MOTOR

PANTS

PATCH ON GARMENT

PERSON

PICKING BERRIES

PIKE (FISH)

PINTAIL DUCK

PLUCKING IT

POOR THING!

PORCUPINE

PTARMIGAN

RAIN

REGULARLY HE USES IT

RIB

ROPE (OF TWISTED FIBER)

RUFF FOR PARKA HOOD

SCHOOL

SCRATCHING (AN ITCH)

SHORTENING

SKIN BOOT, “MUKLUK”

SLED

SLEEVE

SLIPPING

SMELT

SONG

SOURDOCK, WILD SPINACH

SPOON

SQUIRREL & MARMOT

STICKING UP FOR HIM

STICKLEBACK, “NEEDLEFISH”

STONE, ROCK

STORY KNIFE

STOVE

SUN

SWEEPING IT

TAQUKAQ (MEANING)

TASTING IT

TEA & SUGAR

THIMBLE

THINKING

THUMB

TONGUE

UNDERSTANDING HIM

WAITING FOR HIM

WALRUS

WATER GOING DOWN

WEASEL

WEATHER, WORLD, AWARENESS

WHEN HE SAW ME

WHILE I WAS GOING

WHITEFISH

WHO OWNS IT?

WII (PRONUNCIATION)

WILD RHUBARB

WITHOUT SEEING IT

WOLVERINE

WOMAN’S OR SEMILUNAR KNIFE, “ULU”

WOOD

WRITING

YOU, ANSWER ME!

ILIT Open House 07/11 and 07/12

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Are you in Michigan for the 2013 Linguistic Institute? Come and visit us for our Open House! Stop by to talk to the staff and students about their work here and the possible opportunities that await. We will be open to the public for two times: Thursday July 11th from 9-2 and Friday July 12th from 2-5. We plan on making it an informal event, so bring your friends and stop in throughout the two session times.

We are in the Cooper building near Eastern Michigan University’s campus at 2000 N Huron River Dr. in Ypsilanti.

The easiest way to get here from downtown Ann Arbor is to take “The Ride” on line 3 for $1.50. You can get on at two locations: Ann and State or Glen and Catherine. Take this into Ypsilanti and it will go down Washtenaw Avenue. Your stop will be on Huron River Drive at the Eastern Michigan University Stadium. The LINGUIST List is across the street from the stadium bus stop inside the Cooper Building. On Thursday, one of our interns, Thomas Haider, will be guiding people to the Cooper building from the Ann and State Street stop. The bus will pick people up at 8:55am and Tom will be there around 8:45am. If you miss the bus, the buses run about every half hour and you can take another one into town.

If you get lost, you can call us at 734-487-0144. We look forward to seeing you!

Thomas Haider

Here’s Tom, your friendly tour guide and the face to look for at the bus stop.

 

The LINGUIST List Welcomes the Summer Interns

This summer, we are happy to welcome 10 interns for this summer! They will be put to work by working on various projects such as ELCat, LL-MAP, and MultiTree.  Congratulations interns on being selected for 2013! If you are interested in becoming an intern, be on the look-out for our application cycle to open again next spring. In the mean time, there are other ways to get involved here at LINGUIST List. Just contact us for more information.

Eric Benzschawel [ˈbɛn.ʃɑl]

Eric at the Basler Münster in Basel, Switzerland, taken last spring when he was studying abroad at Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg (Breisgau), Germany.

I’m Eric Benzschawel, a BA candidate for spring 2013, receiving a degree in Linguistics with honors and Germanic Studies, and minors in Dutch and Western European Studies. I’ll be working this summer as an intern at the LINGUIST List through early August, contributing primarily on the MultiTree and LL-MAP projects.  I speak German and Dutch as second languages.

My personal areas of interest in linguistics are: syntax, morphosyntax, morphology, corpus linguistics, and computational linguistics. I’m a Germanophile too, so I enjoy Germanic historical linguistics or linguistic work on modern Germanic languages.  I have a keen interest in Faroese everything (seems like such a cool place!) and histories of Germanic peoples, especially the Dutch Golden Age and the Holy Roman Empire.

All the schoolwork definitely keeps me busy, but that doesn’t mean there’s no free time! I deeply enjoy reading high fantasy, science fiction, history, and linguistics books.  I enjoy music of all genres and play saxophone in the Indiana University Marching Hundred.  I’m also a fan of football (Green Bay Packers), college basketball (Indiana Hoosiers), hockey (Chicago Blackhawks), and soccer (Seattle Sounders FC, Deutsche Nationalmannschaft, Nederlands voetbalelftal).

Emily Remirez

Emily with her dog Sophie.

I was born and raised on the Gulf Coast of Texas and am currently a junior at Rice University in Houston, majoring in Linguistics with a concentration in Cognitive Science and minoring in Anthropology. I have been interested in language for as long as I can remember, and there is very little that I dislike about linguistics. My main interests (for now) are L1 acquisition, cognitive linguistics, linguistic relativity, animal communication, language typology, syntax, morphology, Central and South American languages, language contact, creoles and pidgins, historical linguistics, and phonology. Outside of linguistics, I like animals, reading, Wes Anderson movies, absurdity, science fiction, and Arrested Development.

Dana Fallon

Dana enjoying the scenery in Cinque Terre, Italy.

My name is Dana Fallon and I’m just about to graduate from the University of California, Santa Barbara, with a BA in Linguistics! I also have a French minor and I had the wonderful opportunity of studying abroad in Lyon, France, last year, during which I got to travel through a lot of Europe. In addition to French, I’ve studied Japanese and some Latin. In my spare time, I’m usually playing guitar or piano, knitting/crocheting, or seeking out dogs to play with.

Kaveh Varjoy

Kaveh at a 2012 piano recital with three of his students.

My name is Kaveh Varjoy. I’m a California-born-and-raised linguistics major at UCSB, going into my senior year. I spend my free time going through used bookstores, splashing around in the ocean, and playing the piano (or at least trying to). My favorite TV show is Arrested Development (it’s back – yay!) and my favorite book is Dante’s Divina Commedia, and there is no limit to the amount of music I enjoy, though I do have a soft spot for jazz and the rat pack. My interests in linguistics are based around language documentation – especially sign languages and Deaf culture, North American languages, and African languages – and the sociocultural intersect between form, identity, and (in)justice/equality.

Bryn Hauk

I have known since high school that my passion was linguistics, but it wasn’t until my freshman year at the University of Michigan that I learned of the myriad subfields from which I was expected to choose a lifelong path. Having tried and loved everything from semantics to second-language acquisition, I finally discovered documentary linguistics, which seemed to combine the best parts of all specializations with the added bonus of fieldwork in faraway places. I have been lucky enough to do just that in northwest Russia with the Veps people, and I hope to continue documenting indigenous languages of Russia in the future as I pursue my MA at EMU. At the LINGUIST List, I get the opportunity to flex my documentary muscles working on our Catalogue of Endangered Languages and to learn important new technologies and scripting languages.

Myles Gurule

I’m a sophomore at Brown University, tentatively planning to double-major in Computer Science and Linguistics. My interests include formal language theory, natural language processing, and Slavic languages. I grew up in northern New Mexico and in my spare time, I coach policy debate, read, and go hiking. I’m excited to learn about current linguistic research and discussion as well as the practical linguistic applications of CS.

Jacob Collard

Jacob at a May Day Festival, performing a Longsword Dance.

I am a rising Junior at Swarthmore College and have now been interested in linguistics for over six years, doing work with endangered languages (Ju|’hoan, Valley Zapotec, and Cherokee), computational linguistics, and syntax. I’m also interested in storytelling, writing, and literature, as well as folkdance, board games, and roleplaying games. I tend to lose myself in the forest, as I enjoy hiking and exploring, which I try to do every day.

Lesley Dennison

Hi, I’m Lesley and I am excited to join The LINGUIST List as an ELCat team member! I’ve been interested in languages ever since high school French class, where I would write notes to my best friend in IPA.I graduated from Eastern Michigan University in April of 2013 with a BA in Linguistics and a minor in Japanese. I will be starting my MA in Linguistics at Eastern in the fall of 2013. When I am not doing linguistics, I like to read, write, travel and cater to my adorable cat, Esteban.

Sara Couture

I recently earned a Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics with a minor in German from Wayne State University and I’m currently a summer intern at LINGUIST List. At LINGUIST List, I’m mainly working on the MultiTree project, but I’m also part of the Catalogue of Endangered Languages team and the LL-MAP team. I’m really excited about being immersed in linguistics all summer, learning about the nuts and bolts of language documentation and the technology that is involved.

In hindsight, majoring in Linguistics was inevitable for me. I was one of those nerdy kids who liked to make my own secret codes and alphabets and had notebooks filled with information about Elvish and other constructed languages. Language has always been one of my passions. But I didn’t find the formal field of linguistics until college. I had decided to major in English with the vague notion of becoming an editor or a technical writer. The English degree had a theory requirement, and I chose an Introduction to Linguistics. I absolutely loved it, and when I found out I could become an editor with a Linguistics degree as well as an English degree, I switched majors immediately and the rest is history.

I have an insatiable curiosity about all things linguistic, so it is very difficult for me to narrow down my interests. But at the moment, my primary interests are historical linguistics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, syntax, Germanic linguistics, Celtic linguistics, and English linguistics. Outside of linguistics, I’m always in search of a good story to keep me entertained. I love to read and watch movies. I have a wide, eclectic taste in genres, and I have dabbled in fantasy, science fiction, mystery, historical, classic, thriller, horror, contemporary or westerns. When I’m not doing any of these things, I try to give my mole eyes a rest and go bike riding.

Thomas Haider

I was born 1985 in the area of Munich, Germany. After a sheltered childhood in the middle of Bavaria and some education I pursued an apprenticeship in a physics lab, followed by some more education, a civil service in a youth hostel to finally end up in Heidelberg to study Computational Linguistics and Philosophy. Apart from one year abroad in the Netherlands I have been there for 5 years now, meanwhile enrolled in a Masters programme, writing and reading poetry on stage, dealing with lexical semantics, transgressing borders of verbose gibberish and densified expression.

A Day in the Life of Rebekah McClure, Graduate Student and LINGUIST List Editor

In this series of blog posts, we’ve asked some LINGUIST List staff members to share what it’s like to work at LINGUIST. This post was written by Rebekah McClure. She is currently finishing her first year in the Master’s program in linguistics at Eastern Michigan University. At The LINGUIST List, Rebekah is the Publications Manager and a member of the MultiTree and LL-MAP projects. 

Rebekah showed here breaking the norm by eating a relaxing meal free of distractions at a local Vietnamese restaurant.

5:00 am Jump out of bed to silence the abominable noise that is my alarm. Try not to let the fact that it won’t be light out for another three hours get me down.

5:01 am Slip into the thick wool sweater placed strategically by my bed the night before. Think how environmentally conscious I’m being by keeping the thermostat low.

5:01.005 am Retract previous thought. Think new thought about how I actually just like saving a few bucks on monthly utilities bills but that my goose bumps feel infinitely more noble when they come in the name of energy conservation.

5:46 am Drive to the gym and to my secret life as a weightlifting enthusiast.

6:00 am Squeeze in a workout before a day of LINGUIST List, classes, and yoga teaching.

7:14 am Arrive home and initiate matutinal cleansing, eating, studying, and dawdling rituals.

9:47 am Give my still husband a good-bye kiss that he will have no recollection of since he was up late the night before writing a paper for his Modern Japanese History class and is still sleeping.

9:48 am Leave for Eastern Michigan’s Darrell H. Cooper Building, home of the LINGUIST List.

10:01 am Greet my office mates Brent, the effervescent coffee savant and committed vegan, and Danniella, the perpetually imperturbable British expat and four-time marathoner. Exchange stories of tofurkey and opinions on the best brand of running shoes.

10:05 am Realize I should probably turn my computer on and get to work.

10:07 am Persist in conversing anyway.

10:10 am Turn my computer on and get to work.

10:11 am Log in to email account and check the schedule for meetings and project deadlines that day. Realize that I should have turned my computer on and gotten to work ten minutes ago.

10:13 am Approve Publisher submissions. Find someone in the office to translate one of the descriptions for a German publishing house. Go through my multiple options of German-speaking coworkers and think of how, in times like these, I’m grateful to be working with linguists, many of whom are polyglots.

11:03 am Write an email to (yet another) confused user explaining that you must click on “Submit Journal Information” even if you simply want to register as a publisher and that no, I don’t know why it’s set up that way.

11:06 am Read Journal submissions and be in awe of the multitudinous academic paths a linguist can take and consequently write an article about for a journal. Courtroom discourse or Zulu phonology? Transformational Grammar or politeness phenomena? Realize how much I have yet to learn about the field of linguistics.

11:15 am Approve Journal submissions and publish Journal Calls for Papers for those journals.

11:36 am Draft an email requesting that a user include more information in her Table of Contents submission.

11:40 am Email a reply to a hopeful graduate student and explain that LINGUIST List simply announces new publications—it does not publish books or journals itself—and that I’m sorry your dissertation has been rejected by every other academic publisher but I just can’t help you.

11:42 am Worry about my future as an academic linguist a little bit.

12:06 pm Nibble on lunch as I scan my LINGUIST List intranet page to make sure there aren’t any Publisher, Journal, Journal Calls for Papers, or Table of Contents submissions I missed. Dip broccoli into hummus with left hand and assign with right hand Linguistic Fields to one last Journal description that just came in.

12:27 pm Write an email to (yet another) confused user explaining that you must click on “Submit Journal Information” even if you simply want to register as a publisher and that no, I don’t know why it’s set up that way.

1:00 pm Meet with the MultiTree team. Get excited about new projects.

1:27 pm Return to my office and see three new Publisher submissions for me to approve. Get overwhelmed by new projects.

1:30 pm Explain to a LINGUIST user via email that I’m afraid Klingon is actually not spoken in parts of Cameroon and perhaps you should consider checking your sources before submitting this Journal description.

1:32 pm Worry about my future as an academic linguist a lot.

2:00 pm Conclude worrying about my future as an academic linguist and resolve to forge onward regardless of what lies ahead.

2:01 pm Meet with the PR team. Get excited about new projects.

2:33 pm Receive half a dozen emails from the Benevolent Overpig, our task management system, assigning the new projects just discussed. Get overwhelmed by new projects.

2:35 pm Begin work on a language map of the Kamchatkan peninsula. Type out a long, detailed inquiry in an instant message to Sarah, my tireless LL-MAP “buddy” who tutors me on the intricacies of GPS data points. Acknowledge that it would have saved me time if I had simply gotten up and walked to her office ten feet away. Simultaneously acknowledge that when faced with a similar situation tomorrow I will undoubtedly act in the same manner.

2:36 pm Blame my dependence on technology on factors outside my control—the milieu of my generation, Steve Jobs, my mother. Mourn the imminent death of person-to-person interaction and concede my own complicity in the fall.

2:37 pm Resume work on Kamchatkan map.

3:01 pm Pack everything up and rush to class—LIN436, language acquisition.

3:36 pm Watch videos of toddlers on YouTube and analyze what stage of phonological development they could be passing through.

4:45 pm Leave class with a renewed sense of amazement at the language learning process.

4:46 pm Decide to stay on campus to get some homework done. Struggle through a worksheet in which I’m supposed to analyze the morphology of Tok Pisin, a Papa New Guinean creole that I had never heard of prior to last week.

5:09 pm Worry about my future as an academic linguist really, really a lot.

6:28 pm Chug a protein shake for dinner on my way to teach yoga at the local community college health and fitness center.

7:00 pm Get my zen on.

8:37 pm Return to my apartment feeling calm and collected. Greet my husband and exchange stories from our respective days, each of us making sure the other knows the intricacy and arduousness of the trials we’ve overcome in the past twelve hours.

8:50 pm Put on my thick wool sweater. Read about a former LINGUIST List intern who got into a prestigious PhD program and scored a sweet research grant. Worry about my future as an academic linguist a little less.

8:56 pm Notice the feeling of prickling skin and welcome the appearance of goose bumps. Noble, noble goose bumps.

9:05 pm Initiate my vespertine cleansing, eating, studying, and dawdling rituals.

11:11 pm Not bother to take off my sweater as I climb into bed and brace myself for the abominable noise that will soon be my alarm.

 

Linguistic Survey of India now available at LL-MAP

The LL-MAP team is happy to announce the completion of the digital adaptation of the Linguistic Survey of India map collection. This important series of maps was a survey of the languages of British India, conducted in the first several decades of the 20th century by the British Raj and directed by Irish linguist George A. Grierson. The maps show the locations of dialects, languages, and language families in India, phonetic and morphological distribution, and language contact information. In our digitized versions, we have included the maximal language coding possible (i.e., if a name could refer to either a language or a subgroup, we include codes for both).

LL-MAP resources are freely available for public use. For information on how to use the LL-MAP interface, please visit the Online Help Section of the LL-MAP website or email the LL-MAP team at llmap-contact@linguistlist.org.

Many thanks to our former intern, Andrew Peters, who put in a substantial amount of time last summer getting these maps scanned, georegistered, vectorized, uploaded, and styled. Andrew designed this set of maps to be interoperable, so that the different language families can be easily distinguished when several maps are layered together in the LL-MAP interface. In the map credits, Andrew also identified several other sets of maps that may be of comparative interest. 

The maps that make up this set include:

Linguistic Survey of India: Assamese Dialects

 Linguistic Survey of India: Austro-Asiatic & Pronominalized Himalayan Languages

 Linguistic Survey of India: Balochi Language

 Linguistic Survey of India: Bara Languages and Dialects

 Linguistic Survey of India: Bengali Dialects and Sub-Dialects

 Linguistic Survey of India: Bhil Dialects and Khandesi

Linguistic Survey of India: Bihari Dialects and Sub-Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Central Pahari Languages and Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Dardic Influence

 Linguistic Survey of India: Dardic Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: District of Sonthal Parganas

Linguistic Survey of India: Dravidian Languages

 Linguistic Survey of India: Eastern Hindi Dialects and Sub-Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Ghalchah Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: Indo-Aryan Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: Kachin Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Kashmiri Language

Linguistic Survey of India: Lahnda or Western Panjabi Dialects and Sub-Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Languages in which L is the characteristic letter of the past participle

Linguistic Survey of India: Marathi Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Munda Languages and Dialects

 Linguistic Survey of India: Naga Languages and Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Pashto and Ormuri Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: Punjabi Dialects and Sub-Dialects

Linguistic Survey of India: Rajasthani Dialects and Sub-Dialects 

Linguistic Survey of India: Relative Positions of Munda, Complex Pronominalized Himalayan, & Indian Languages Connected with Mon-Khmer

Linguistic Survey of India: Siamese-Chinese Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: Sindhi Language

Linguistic Survey of India: Tai Languages

Linguistic Survey of India: Tibeto-Burman Groups

Linguistic Survey of India: Western Hindi Dialects and Sub-Dialects 

Linguistic Survey of India: Western Pahari Languages and Dialects

LL-MAP around the world

The LL-MAP project has  been a hub of activity this summer. Our team of graduate students conducted internal training workshops in May and June to train incoming interns on mapmaking using Global Mapper and the LL-MAP uploader, and our team has been pumping out fascinating language maps all summer.

Several important sources were scanned , georegistered, vectorized, and styled into new digital map resources. Examples include the entire Linguistic Survey of India from 1903, a host of maps in the Pacific such as this example  in Indonesia, and Powell’s report from 1890 of the American Indian languages.

In June, LL-MAP was also featured at two workshops. I had the honor of presenting the LL-MAP Scholar’s Workbench at the Language Documentation 3 conference at the University of Bolzano in Bolzano (Bozen), Italy. The topic of this year’s conference was Language Mapping, and I showed attendees how to use LL-MAP for language research and how to begin making their own maps in the Scholar’s Workbench. LL-MAP was also the central topic in a workshop on language mapping taught by Anthony Aristar, Helen Aristar-Dry, and Joshua Thompson at the CoLang 2012 Institute hosted by the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas.

The new Quick Reference Guide to LL-MAP

In preparation for the 2012 Language Mapping Workshop, the LL-MAP team realized that we needed an answer to the question–“How do I use the most basic features of the LL-MAP Map Viewer?” As a quick (and visual) answer to this question, the team has created the Quick Reference Guide to LL-MAP!

First unveiled at our workshop, now you can enjoy it too! This incredibly useful guide features numbered boxes designating the most important parts of the LL-MAP interface and a key to the features listed in these boxes. By following the order listed on the map and using the map key on the next page, users can now easily and quickly navigate the LL-MAP interface and grasp the most essential features of LL-MAP.

While we worked tirelessly in preparation for this workshop to enumerate all aspects of LL-MAP in our help pages, we have now highlighted the most essential features of LL-MAP in our Quick Reference Guide so that you can start using LL-MAP now. Haven’t used LL-MAP before? Start using the Quick Reference Guide and you’ll be up to speed in no time. And if you’ve already been viewing the maps in this wonderful project,  you may want to use the Quick Reference Guide to make sure you aren’t missing out on any of the great features that LL-MAP offers for your research or teaching needs.

Upcoming Events: LL-MAP Workshop, Presentation by Dr. Maƚgosia Ćavar

This Friday, LINGUIST List is hosting two special events:

Friday, 4/13, 11 am – 1 pm: The LL-MAP Scholar’s Workbench Workshop will introduce attendees to using the LL-MAP interface and Scholar’s Workbench tool, including tutorials on how to map your own data.  The workshop is open to the public, and will be held at Eastern Michigan University’s Halle Library, room 111.  If you’d like to attend, please register here:

http://llmap.org/llmap-flyer

 

Friday, 4/13, 1:30 pm: ILIT faculty affiliate Dr. Maƚgosia Ćavar will be presenting a talk at LINGUIST List entitled On the influence of L1 on L2 perception: The case of tenseness contrast in American vowels.  This will also be open to anyone– if you’re in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area, you’re invited to attend!  For those unfortunate readers who can’t make it to Michigan, we’ll be recording Dr. Ćavar’s talk and making it available online.

 

We hope to see you on Friday!

Upcoming Language Mapping Workshop: An Introduction to the LL-MAP Scholar’s Workbench

The Institute for Language Information and Technology (ILIT) at Eastern Michigan University invites any interested students and faculty for a mapping tutorial on April 13, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in Halle Library Room 111. This tutorial will introduce the LL-MAP database and provide a hands-on demonstration of the LL-MAP Scholar’s Workbench.

LL-MAP (Language and Location: A Map Accessibility Project, llmap.org) is a database of maps with geospatially-referenced information about existing languages.  LL-MAP also includes a user-friendly online interface which organizes linguistic, geographic and social sciences information into customizable map layers.  Scholars and students can use the newly-updated database interface to query and compare language maps, draw new hypotheses about language, layer different maps together, and even share a map on Facebook!

Another feature of LL-MAP that has recently been released is the Scholar’s Workbench.  In this workspace, scholars can upload their own data or use existing datasets to create new maps showing their hypotheses about linguistic phenomena. In this workshop, we will be demonstrating the possibilities of this dynamic and user-friendly uploading facility. In a hands-on demonstration, participants will go through the process of turning data into a language map by uploading a data set as well as styling and describing it.

Registration is free but space is limited. Please go to the following web address to register:

http://llmap.org/llmap-flyer

For questions, contact Amy Brunett (brunett@linguistlist.org).

Schedule:
April 13, 2012, 11 AM –1 PM
Halle Library, EMU, Room 111

About the LL-MAP database…..11:00-11:15
How the Scholar’s Workbench works…..11:15-11:30
The Uploader in action: Hands-on demo…..11:30-12:30
Questions/feedback…..12:30-1:00

LL-MAP: Making scholarly maps for a digital medium

In the course of working on LL-MAP, I have learned that there are several differences between a traditional paper map as shown in a scholarly resource and a digital map that’s meant to be viewed on the LL-MAP interface; these differences affect the process of how we digitize and adapt traditional maps to be displayed in LL-MAP.

Traditional resources have been created for isolated viewing; whether on paper or using computer software they are generally intended to be viewed in one context. This means that elevation or contour lines and special map and legend symbols will show the map user a clear picture but only within the context of this specific map. In LL-MAP, we are trying to bring this information to a large web-based application where it is compatible with other maps. This often requires that we adapt the map in such a way that it (1) is viewed easily and (2) is as informative as possible.

To do this, we utilize several features of our dynamic mapping application that are not present in normal static map applications. First, we have written an HTML-based description and crediting template that allows for a large amount of descriptive information to be attributed to the map, as well as providing source and citation information. As shown in the map of the Linguistic Composition of Iran, this template allows for other relevant information such as first-language speaker data by percentage.

The structure of maps as layers in LL-MAP is another advantage offered by digital formats. Now, if you wanted to view just one or two languages and compare them, you can simply uncheck the other layers in the legend on the right. In this way, LL-MAP allows you to view smaller pieces of the map to get specific pieces of information. This is an advantage over traditional maps, as it allows you to first understand the localized context of a language you are investigating before roving more widely to related languages or language families. Returning to the Linguistic Composition of Iran, one way to view an example of this resource would be to uncheck ‘Arabic’ from the list of map components in the legend. Now, when we check this again we can see where Semitic languages have intermixed with other language groups. The ability to turn on and off layers dynamically cannot be understated, as this component is crucial to easily understanding large amounts of map data. It is also crucial for focusing in on one type of data.

One other feature of digital mapmaking that augments traditional map resources is the ability to dynamically click on an area of a map to see more information about that feature. For the map of Hua’er Festivals and Deity Renewals in Qinghai and Gansu, we can right click on these data points to see information such the data the festival took place, the number of attendees, and other relevant information. If you zoom in to the point marked ‘Lianhuashan’ in the center of the map and right click, you can even find audio files of direct recordings from this event!

This feature showcases another strength of LL-MAP’s dynamic interface–the capability for including media in maps in image, audio, or video formats. Finally, viewing maps with LL-MAP differs fundamentally from viewing static maps, as we can encode several ‘levels’ of information that are meant to be viewed at different zoom levels. Viewing a map of Ethnolinguistic Groups in the Caucasus Region, for example, we see that at the default zoom level there are no labels shown for the shapes that contain the boundaries of ethnic groups. When we zoom in one level further, however, we find that these labels appear. If you zoom in even further you can see regional placenames marked and finally at a very close zoom you’ll see the placename labels themselves appear. This feature is great for managing crowded labels or controlling the information you’d like to view at each zoom level.

I hope that you have enjoyed learning about some of the main features that make LL-MAP a dynamic place to make maps about language, culture or other related geographical features. So, take some time out of your day (or holiday) to explore the wide range of dynamic data on LL-MAP!