One-Day Giveaway: Win a Copy of Manual of Language Acquisition from De Gruyter!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

The Fund Drive is winding down right now, but we still have a lot of great publisher prizes to give away before the end of Fund Drive.  So we’re going to ramp up the tempo and be giving away a prize daily.

For today’s prize, De Gruyter Mouton has donated a copy of the Manual of Language Acquisition, edited by Christine Fäcke, a perfect volume for anyone who is interested in language acquisition, especially in Romance languages.  You can view a summary of the book here:

http://goo.gl/jpJeGR

Valued at $280, it can yours for at least a $50 donation.  Donate tomorrow before noon (April 28, 11:59 AM EST) to be eligible to win.  You can donate at the link below:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

In addition to the one-time donations to our Fund Drive, you can also become a recurring donor and support LINGUIST List on a long-term basis.  Find out how by following this link:

http://goo.gl/Q27jls

Please spread the word about our Fund Drive.  You can do so by liking, sharing, and retweeting on social media.  Every bit of support helps and is vital to the continuing existence of LINGUIST List.

Thanks and good luck!

Linguistically yours,

The LINGUIST List Crew

 

Win a Copy of English as an International Language in Asia from Springer!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

Today’s prize, we are giving away a copy of English as an International Language in Asia: Implications for Language Education (edited by Andy Kirkpatrick and Roland Sussex), generously donated by Springer.  You can read about the book more here:

http://goo.gl/oooQGs

This title is normally valued at $129 USD, but can be yours for as little as a $50 donation! Enter to win by donating before midnight tomorrow (April 24, 11:59 p.m. EST).  For our donation page, follow the link below:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

Thanks and good luck!

Sincerely,

The LINGUIST List Crew

Featured Linguist: Monica Macaulay

Featured Linguist: Monica Macaulay

Featured Linguist: Monica Macaulay

So, you know how most kids want to be firefighters, or doctors, or scientists when they grow up?  When I was a kid I wanted to be a librarian.  Yes, I was the biggest nerd in the world.  It was just that I loved to read and I loved to organize things, so organizing books sounded really good.  I also played Scrabble with my mom, and we would look words up in her immense “Shorter Oxford English Dictionary,” which we regarded as the authority on all matters language-related.

When I was 15 we moved to Santiago, Chile.  My mother was thrilled because her children were going to learn to speak a second language.  So, being 15, I decided I wasn’t going to learn it.  Unfortunately, I did, despite my best efforts.  So I spent about six months hiding it from my parents until it just got too hard to pretend.  We were there for a year and a half.  By the end of our time there my Spanish was so good I could fool people into thinking I was Chilean.  It’s been downhill ever since.

I graduated in Chile from Santiago College – that was my high school – a girl’s school with the motto “for finer womanhood.”  I was 16 and it made perfect sense to me that since I had graduated from high school I was an adult.  So I took off overland with my boyfriend and spent three months traveling through South America.  My parents, of course, were absolutely horrified.  It was quite an adventure and I did live to tell about it.  Then the boyfriend and I moved to Prescott, AZ, where we attended a hippy college for a while.  Next up, San Francisco, where I went to art school.  (Of course.)  We lived on a houseboat in Sausalito.  I finally dumped art school (no talent, just a love of art supplies) and the BF, and moved to Berkeley.

Eventually I realized I might want to go to college (a real one), and that there was one in the town I lived in. So I applied and got into UC-Berkeley.  It took me 7 years to finish.  I kept dropping out to do things like hitch-hike through Mexico, but that’s another story.  Everyone in Mexico laughed at my Chilean accent so I quickly modified it.

I took random classes in college, just not sure what I wanted to do.  But then one day I saw a course listing for a class in the English department that I thought would help me with my crossword puzzles, an obsession at the time.  It turned out to be 1965-era Standard Theory, taught as gospel truth.  (This was the mid/late-70s.)  I was hooked.  And OH MY GOD at the end of the semester I discovered there was a whole department of this stuff.  That was it, I never looked back.  I had finally found the place where I could combine my love of words and my love of organizing things into systems.

Cut to grad school (still at Berkeley – who would want to leave that beautiful place?).  I was there in a phase where the only required course in the linguistics graduate program was a 2-semester sequence in field methods.  (This is how I managed to get a PhD and never take an actual phonology course!)  They were offering two sections the year I took it.  I knew one was going to use Vietnamese, and I said, no way, that’s a tone language, I’m not doing tone.  The other one turned out to be Mixtec.  Nuff said.

Despite the tone, I discovered I loved eliciting and analyzing data.  Eventually I did fieldwork in Mexico (and I’ve written about that elsewhere), and wrote my dissertation on the language.  After a year’s stint at George Mason University I wound up in the English department at Purdue University.  Indiana was a bit of a shock after 14 years in the Bay Area.  But I met my husband, Joe Salmons, there, and made a lot of good friends.

The year after I got tenure, though, we moved to Madison to take jobs at the University of Wisconsin.  I grew up in Madison, so it was quite strange to return home after all those years.  When we moved there I was just finishing up my grammar of Chalcatongo Mixtec, and it seemed like a good time to make a change.  Ever since hearing Amy Dahlstrom talk about Algonquian languages in graduate school I had had a bad case of Algonquian envy.  Wisconsin has five native languages which are still spoken, three of which are Algonquian.  I satisfied my Algonquian envy by starting to work on Menominee, and have continued that ever since.  There’s a steep learning curve for Algonquian linguistics, but it’s totally worth it.

A couple of interesting things have happened along the way, to me and to the profession.  I didn’t start out feeling like an Americanist – that is, I didn’t feel like I was one of those people who would characterize themselves as working on American Indian languages; I just happened to work on Mixtec (and also a California language called Karuk).  But that identity snuck up on me, and I definitely define myself as an Americanist now.  The other thing that has happened is that the field has undergone a radical transformation, and me along with it.  This is the recognition that the vast majority of the languages we work on are severely endangered, that our work with communities has as much value as our scholarly work, and that we need to take responsibility for helping communities out with language revitalization when and how they want us to.

2014XmasMM2

Documentary and theoretical approaches coexist and enrich each other, and American Indian languages are in the thick of it.  When I was in graduate school it was pretty much unthinkable that people from the theory-dominant departments would do fieldwork – now it seems like most everybody does some.  And I find myself working with community members on dictionaries of Menominee and Potawatomi, something I never could have imagined myself doing when I was in grad school.  The benefits of these changes to the field are enormous, and I think we’re in a much healthier place as a discipline now.

From 2009 to 2014, Joe Salmons, Anja Wanner, Rajiv Rao, and I were the review editors for Linguist List.   It was a lot of work but we were proud of the quality (and quantity!) of the reviews we posted.  After stepping down from that, I became a co-editor of the Papers of the Algonquian Conference, and last January I became president of the Endangered Language Fund (http://www.endangeredlanguagefund.org/).  We give grants for small projects on endangered languages all over the world.

Just a footnote:  linguistics ruined Scrabble for me.  It’s just that pesky question of what counts as a word!  I mean, can you use “ish”?

Please support the Linguist List with a donation today.

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Find Out How to Win a One-Year Subscription to the Journal of Language Contact from Brill

Dear LINGUIST List Readers:

For our latest Fund Drive Drawing today, Brill is giving away three one-year online subscriptions to the Journal of Language Contact.  You can read about the journal here:

http://goo.gl/dFGXDW

This subscription, normally valued at $100, could be yours for as little as a $50 donation!  If you donate before midnight tomorrow (April 23, 11:59 p.m. EST), three of you could be the lucky winners. You can do so by following the link below:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

Thanks and good luck!

Linguistically yours,

The LINGUIST List Crew

Reminder: Send Us Your New LINGUIST Logo and Check Out Some of Our Favorite Submissions!

Hello Linguist List Subscribers and Friends (and Graphic Designers!),

This month we started a brand new contest: Design a New LINGUIST List Logo! We are looking for a new logo for our website—one that is modern, cool, and captures the essences of LINGUIST List. LINGUIST List is operated by and used by linguists, so why not have a linguist design our new logo?

To see the history of LINGUIST List’s logos, please refer to our previous blog post: http://blog.linguistlist.org/uncategorized/ethos-pathos-logos/

It’s time for a change. We have extended our deadline and are calling all of our graphic design savvy subscribers out to help us with this task! If you are interested in design and looking to get your name out there, and want to help us out, please read our terms and conditions and enter the contest! We have more than 25,000 mailing list subscribers, more than 27,000 social media followers in the world, and more than 1.5 million unique visitors on the website per year. That’s a lot of people viewing your art work!

Please send any logos you’ve designed to funddrive@linguistlist.org in svg format.

Please check out just a few of the submission we’ve already received by some very talented linguists:

Submitted by  Laura Longworth

Submitted by Laura Longworth

Submitted by Leena Alhudaif

Submitted by Leena Alhudaif

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by  Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Stefan Schäfer

Submitted by Stefan Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lukas Sönning

Submitted by Lukas Sönning

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Francesco Screti

Submitted by Francesco Screti

Submitted by Christine Poteau

Submitted by Christine Poteau

Submitted by Heeyoung Ahn

Submitted by Heeyoung Ahn

Submitted by Laura Longworth

Submitted by Laura Longworth

Submitted by  Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Alice Mitchell

Submitted by Alice Mitchell

Submitted by Tamara Stojanovic

Submitted by Tamara Stojanovic

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

How cool are these new logo ideas? Please send your logo submissions to funddrive@linguistlist.org. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Remember, as always, LINGUIST List is a free and openly available resource dedicated to providing the best service possible for all fields of linguistics. Please support the LINGUIST List Fund Drive 2015 with a contribution:

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Sincerely,

Your LINGUIST List Team

________________

Terms and Conditions

  1. This competition consists in a contest to design a logo for LINGUIST List. It is open to everyone.
  2. To enter the competition, design a logo to be used on the LINGUIST List website. Design an image which you think incorporates the essence of LINGUIST List. Email your design in svg format to funddrive@linguistlist.org.
  3. All photos, drawings, text, and any other content or information submitted by you to LINGUIST List shall become the sole and exclusive property of LINGUIST List, and LINGUIST List shall have no obligation to preserve or return content to you. If you are selected as the winner, you are allowing LINGUIST List to use your design for free and for any purpose.
  4. We will acknowledge the winner on our web site by mentioning their name and affiliation if requested. No monetary compensation is foreseen.
  5. We reserve the right not to select a winner, and not to use any provided logos.
  6. Entries must be entirely your own original work and must not breach any copyright or third party rights. LINGUIST List will not be made partially or fully liable for any non-original work submitted by you. All entries must be suitable for publication on the LINGUIST List website and public viewing. The design must not include any defamatory, offensive or unlawful content.
  7. Entrants will be deemed to have accepted these rules and to agree to be bound by them when entering this competition.
  8. This competition is administered by LINGUIST List.

Get a Chance to Win “Sounds Interesting” from Cambridge University Press: Donate Today!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

For our Fund Drive raffle today, Cambridge University Press is donating two copies of J.C. Wells’ Sounds Interesting: Observations on English and General Phonetics. Read the book summary here:

http://goo.gl/jJSyAt

Donate before midnight tomorrow (April 16, 11:59 pm EST), and two of you could be the lucky winners! You can donate by following the link below:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

Please be sure to spread the word about our Fund Drive – like, share, retweet. We appreciate all of your support!

Thanks and good luck!

Linguistically yours,
The LINGUIST List Crew

Win a One-Year Subscription to Morgan and Claypool’s Entire Digital Library!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

For today’s Fund Drive raffle, we are giving a one-year subscription to Morgan and Claypool’s entire online digital library, which includes the Synthesis Digital Library of Engineering and Computer Science.  You can browse Morgan and Claypool’s collection here:

http://goo.gl/K1VyV8

If you donate before midnight tomorrow (April 18, 11:59 p.m. EST), this great resource for computational linguists, valued at $99, could be yours for as little as a $50 USD donation!  To donate, go to the following link:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

Please spread the word about our Fund Drive.  You can do this either by good old word of mouth, or you can like, share and retweet our Fund Drive announcements on social media

Thanks and good luck!

Sincerely,

The LINGUIST List Crew

Last Call: Submit Your Brand New Logo Design for LINGUIST List!

Hello Linguist List Subscribers and Friends (and Graphic Designers!),

This month we started a brand new contest: Design a New LINGUIST List Logo! We are looking for a new logo for our website—one that is modern, cool, and captures the essences of LINGUIST List. LINGUIST List is operated by and used by linguists, so why not have a linguist design our new logo?

To see the history of LINGUIST List’s logos, please refer to our previous blog post: http://blog.linguistlist.org/uncategorized/ethos-pathos-logos/

It’s time for a change. We are calling all of our graphic design savvy subscribers out to help us with this task! If you are interested in design and looking to get your name out there, and want to help us out, please read our terms and conditions and enter the contest! We have more than 25,000 mailing list subscribers, more than 27,000 social media followers in the world, and more than 1.5 million unique visitors on the website per year. That’s a lot of people viewing your art work!

Please send any logos you’ve designed to funddrive@linguistlist.org in svg format.

Please check out a few of the submission we’ve already received by some very talented linguists:

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Alice Mitchell

Submitted by Alice Mitchell

Submitted by  Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Francesco Screti

Submitted by Francesco Screti

Submitted by Tamara Stojanovic

Submitted by Tamara Stojanovic

Submitted by Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Aubrey Nunes

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

Submitted by Lea Schäfer

How cool are these new logo ideas? We are going to go to a vote soon, but before we do, we want to put out ONE FINAL CALL for submissions! Please send your logo submissions to funddrive@linguistlist.org. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Remember, as always, LINGUIST List is a free and openly available resource dedicated to providing the best service possible for all fields of linguistics. Please support the LINGUIST List Fund Drive 2015 with a contribution:

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Sincerely,

Your LINGUIST List Team

________________

Terms and Conditions

  1. This competition consists in a contest to design a logo for LINGUIST List. It is open to everyone.
  2. To enter the competition, design a logo to be used on the LINGUIST List website. Design an image which you think incorporates the essence of LINGUIST List. Email your design in svg format to funddrive@linguistlist.org.
  3. All photos, drawings, text, and any other content or information submitted by you to LINGUIST List shall become the sole and exclusive property of LINGUIST List, and LINGUIST List shall have no obligation to preserve or return content to you. If you are selected as the winner, you are allowing LINGUIST List to use your design for free and for any purpose.
  4. We will acknowledge the winner on our web site by mentioning their name and affiliation if requested. No monetary compensation is foreseen.
  5. We reserve the right not to select a winner, and not to use any provided logos.
  6. Entries must be entirely your own original work and must not breach any copyright or third party rights. LINGUIST List will not be made partially or fully liable for any non-original work submitted by you. All entries must be suitable for publication on the LINGUIST List website and public viewing. The design must not include any defamatory, offensive or unlawful content.
  7. Entrants will be deemed to have accepted these rules and to agree to be bound by them when entering this competition.
  8. This competition is administered by LINGUIST List.

Lang Doc; Socioling: Donate to Win a Copy of Small Language Fates and Prospects from Brill!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

For our Fund Drive raffle today, Brill is donating a copy of Nancy Dorian’s Small Language Fates and Prospects, a book of essays on bilingualism and language endangerment of Scottish Gaelic.  Read the book summary here:

http://goo.gl/pTKNUX

Normally valued at $162 USD, this book can be yours for a minimum donation of $50 USD.  Donate before midnight tomorrow (April 16, 11:59 pm EST), and you could be the lucky winner!  You can donate by following the link below:

http://goo.gl/e656LG

Please be sure to spread the word about our Fund Drive – like, share, retweet.  We appreciate all of your support.

Thanks and good luck!

Linguistically yours,

The LINGUIST List Crew

A Special Announcement:

Dear LINGUIST List subscribers,

A brief paws from our regular postings for a special announcement: You’ve seen her coyly hiding in blog posts before, but I would like to officially introduce you to the LINGUIST List Office Puppy, Blondie!

image1-e1429024643871

Blondie

Though Gosia and Damir own Blondie, I’m sure the rest of the crew here would agree with me that Blondie has become a beloved member of the larger LINGUIST List family. Who knew coming to work at LINGUIST List could be even more fun?

image1-e1429025997358

Here are some fun facts about Blondie to help you get to know her better:

Blondie is a White Shepherd — a breed that is a descendant of German Shepherds, but is most commonly found in Canada and the United States.

IMG_1783

Right now, Blondie excitedly plods around with feet that are a little too big for the rest of her body and is still small enough to be picked up (though not without a bit of effort!) but eventually, she will grow to be 60-70 pounds, and two feet tall at her shoulders.

This little cutie loves to be where everyone else does. She is quite the social butterfly and greets everyone, making sure they feel welcome. In her free time she likes to chew on things (like sticks and her toys), and generally look adorable.

Is your tree structure missing a branch? Blondie might be chewing on it.

Is your tree structure missing a branch? Blondie might be chewing on it.

 

She has taken it upon herself to oversee staff meetings. Here is a picture of her in one of our more recent meetings.

(Blondie likes to take a relaxed approach when heading meetings.)

(Blondie likes to take a relaxed approach when heading meetings.)

Blondie has had a doggone good time hanging out around our office, and has learned a lot about our yearly Fund Drive, which is still going on! All of us here at LINGUIST List would really appreciate you considering donating to help keep LINGUIST List up and running; able to help connect linguists around the world and foster academic growth in the linguistic community.

Blondie repping in some LINGUIST List swag!

Blondie repping some LINGUIST List swag!

—————————————————

Please support Blondie’s friends at The LINGUIST List! We need as much help as we can get during Fund Drive 2015. LINGUIST List really needs your support!

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Thank you all!
Your LINGUIST Crew