Got an abstract? There are 218 conferences awaiting your submission.

Think about it: in your career, how many conferences have you gone to? How many have you presented at? How many abstracts have you submitted for papers, talks, poster sessions, panels, and colloquia?

And of those, how many did you find out about through the LINGUIST List?

An academic’s need to attend and present at conferences, and the inherently chaotic nature of the academic conference system, is precisely what makes the Calls and Conferences feature of the LINGUIST List such an indispensable tool. Rather than relying on word of mouth or hoping that your colleagues will remember to CC you on an email, you can count on LINGUIST to keep you informed about your field’s most important conference and the associated call for papers.

But we do far more than just email you this important information: we also have a searchable database of all upcoming linguistic conferences (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/browse-current.cfm?type=Conf) and all active calls for papers (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/browse-current.cfm?type=call). We also have an events calendar to keep you organized (http://linguistlist.org/callconf/eventcalendar.cfm), so you’ll never have to present in Germany one day and Japan the next.

If you’re a conference organizer, you probably know how much easier it is to submit a conference announcement, program, and call for papers via LINGUIST than to email your colleagues one by one. You also know that we circulate your submission within 48 hours. But did you know that we provide a free, user-friendly platform (http://linguistlist.org/confservices/EasyAbs/index.cfm) for your participants to submit abstracts? Or that we’re developing an online registration service (http://linguistlist.org/confservices/EasyReg/index.cfm) to bring your attendees to you, minus the headaches?

As of this week, the LINGUIST List has records for 787 conferences taking place all over the world between now and September 2015, with 218 active calls for papers. And these aren’t just English: we distribute announcements in French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and, once, even Papiamento!

We do all this for the sake of the linguistic community at no cost to you, which means we rely solely upon the generosity of our supporters. If you have found these services valuable, please donate to the LINGUIST List today.

http://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm.

Without your donation, we can’t continue to provide our Calls and Conferences services that you, as an academic, rely on. We’re counting on you!

With sincerest gratitude,

Bryn Hauk, Xiyan Wang & Anna White
Calls & Conferences Editors

Another Week, Another Routledge Giveaway! Donate Now!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

If the Monday blues has got you down, then LINGUIST List just might have the pick me up you need to get excited: This week’s Routledge giveaway!

Anyone who donates this week is eligible to win either the title of their choice from Routledge’s Handbooks in Applied Linguistics series, or a one year subscription to their preferred Linguistics journal! For more details, please visit the link below:

http://www.routledge.com/u/FundDrive14

This is a prize you don’t want to pass up, so donate today!

http://linguistlist.org/donation/

Plus, a donation of $35 or more will guarantee you one of our great Fund Drive Premiums!

http://linguistlist.org/fund-drive/2014/premiums.php

Good luck!

The LINGUIST List Crew

Making the Most of LINGUIST: Additional and Special Interest Resources

Some LINGUIST resources aren’t so easy to classify. In this last letter, we’ve grouped some of the lesser-known features that may be of interest to you.

LINGUIST has established a presence on a variety of social networking sites. Connect with us by clicking the links below:

Various linguistic resources can only be found on the World Wide Web. Luckily, LINGUIST has an area for that!

  • Web Resources/Software: This area of the LINGUIST List contains links to websites and software devoted to natural and constructed languages, to writing systems, and to language resources on the web (such as dictionaries).
  • FYI: As mentioned in our previous letter, the FYI area contains information that doesn’t neatly fit into any single LINGUIST posting topic, such as calls for book chapters, award recipient announcements, new journal editor announcements, scholarship announcements, etc.
  • Discussion: The Discussion area is one of LINGUIST’s best kept secrets (but we’d like it to be not-so-secret). Discussions posted on the LINGUIST site have spawned many publications, collaborations, and thought-provoking linguistic observations and ponderings. Join the discussion!
  • Mailing Lists: There are a number of mailing lists linked in here that are related to different facets of linguistics and language.

LINGUIST’s projects also cater to various linguistic interests.

  • Tutorials: These tutorials were designed by programmers to help train linguistics students for work at LINGUIST. They’re very helpful introductions (or, for some of you, refreshers) for the technical work linguists engage in.
  • Linguistic Blogs: Here you can see what linguists on the web have to say about language:
  • Learning Languages Other than English: These resources will help you find language learning resources.
  • English Language Learning (EFL/ESL): LINGUIST also contains a variety of resources for learning English.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this Making the Most of LINGUIST letter series! As always, if you have any questions about the services LINGUIST offers its readers and subscribers, don’t hesitate to ask.

Today’s Prize is Up to Spec(Gram)! Donate to Win!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

Today we’re proud to offer a prize from the first, foremost, and possibly only publisher of satirical linguistics: Speculative Grammarian! If you donate before 11:59 p.m. today, you could be one of 5 lucky winners to walk away with a SpecGram prize package, which includes a copy of The Speculative Grammarian Essential Guide to Linguistics, as well as a SpecGram magnet or poster!

You can read the description for this must have volume at the URL below (and if you happen to pay money for a book you may win for free anyway while you’re there, I’m sure the good folks at SpecGram won’t complain):

http://specgram.com/SGEGL/

Remember, to win, you need to donate today!

http://linguistlist.org/donation/

And don’t forget, LINGUIST List also has many great premiums we’d love to send you if you donate $35 or more!

http://linguistlist.org/fund-drive/2014/premiums.php

Good luck!

The LINGUIST List Crew

Featured Linguist: Joel Sherzer

Today we are continuing to update you on the most inspiring stories from scholars all over the world. Please welcome our Featured Linguist Joel Sherzer who is sharing his story with our readers and subscribers. Take a look below!

Joel Sherzer

How I Became a Linguist
by Joel Sherzer

My contribution to linguistics has been to analyze language in cultural and social contexts. I have used this approach to my study of the language and culture of the Kuna of Panama, the work I am best known for. Many students and scholars who have worked with Latin American indigenous languages and peoples have been influenced by my work.

It all started in Central High School in Philadelphia. Four years of high school Spanish kindled my interest in languages other than English and in grammar. Oberlin College was a decisive experience. I studied French, Spanish, Latin, and Russian, as well as a smattering of linguistics. In the summers I participated in Oberlin programs in France and Mexico. I also took part in a Princeton program in Paris where I sold books in the department store Au Printemps.

After I graduated Oberlin I had a Fulbright fellowship in Mexico that enabled me to study Nahuatl, one of many people who cut their linguistic teeth on this fascinating language. I became part of a group of fascinating anthropologists, linguists, and artists. They worked with Morris Swadesh on Mexican indigenous languages and cultures, including an effort to decipher Mayan hieroglyphs, and volunteered their expertise for the linguistics section of the then new museum of anthropology in Chapultepec park.

With a Woodrow Wilson fellowship I began graduate work in linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania in 1965. There I was fortunate to study and interact with a creative, dynamic, and pioneering group of people in various departments. The work of my Penn teachers has remained with me all of my scholarly life. Along with others, I frequently crossed the street between the anthropology and linguistic departments.
Henry Hoenigswald stressed areal and typological approaches to language change and history.
Dell Hymes trained me in ethnographic approaches to language.
David Sapir, like his father Edward, used texts to reveal grammatical and cultural patterning in his research in Africa.
Erving Goffman focused on structure and pattern in everyday interaction. Bill Labov elaborated fieldwork techniques and studied variation in language use.
My dissertation, which I rewrote as a book, dealt with areal-typological patterns in indigenous languages north of Mexico.

After grad school I was offered a position at the University of Texas in the Anthropology and Linguistics departments. I developed a program in linguistic anthropology, along with wonderful colleagues, Richard Bauman, Greg Urban, and Tony Woodbury. In my first year at Texas I edited Morris Swadesh’s book on the origin and diversification of language. This was a labor of love, as Swadesh had become a good friend before his untimely death. Another person I became close to over the years was William Bright, with whom I shared interests in areal-typological linguistics and verbal art.

While at Texas I began many years of fieldwork among the Kuna of Panama. My Kuna research involved close collaboration with individuals who do not read or write but who shared with me their remarkable linguistic and cultural knowledge, expressed in their conversations, stories, myths, chants, and songs. In addition, I have over the years become friends with and collaborated with many people who study various aspects of Kuna life.

My approach to Kuna language and culture led me to develop, along with colleagues Greg Urban and Tony Woodbury, what has come to be called the discourse centered approach to language and culture. We organized a series of conferences at Texas where people presented their work on different forms of discourse found in indigenous America. The tape recordings were transcribed and translated and stored in published form and/or in libraries. With the availability of the Internet, along with Christine Beier, Heidi Johnson, Lev Michael, and Tony Woodbury, I founded and now direct AILLA, The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America, whose purpose is to preserve indigenous languages by archiving them in digital form. AILLA has been very successful. Up to now over 250 languages have been archived, and AILLA will no doubt continue to grow.

Within linguistics and linguistic anthropology, two foci have come to characterize my work, speech play and verbal art. These foci have taken me to various places in the world, including Panama, Mexico, France, and Bali.

Joel Sherzer

New Evidence for Neanderthal Language Announced

YPSILANTI, Michigan – The controversy over whether Neanderthals possessed a capacity for language may have been resolved. After years of speculation by evolutionary anthropologists and geneticists, a group of linguists has announced today that they have uncovered written evidence proving the Neanderthal capacity for language.

“Neanderthal man was able to express his ideas about the world around him, but was restricted by his limited syntax,” Professor Schmaltz explained at today’s press conference. “Whereas modern man combines words hierarchically into structure, the Neanderthal could only concatenate them linearly.”

It seems that Neanderthals had a single syllable oog, which, when repeated, formed different words. oog has been translated as ‘Oog’ a proper name, oog.oog meant ‘two people named Oog,’ oog.oog.oog meant ‘emotionally distant – like a teenager anxious to move out of his parents’ cave’ and so on.

Schmaltz’ team was able to identify and translate two texts left by Neanderthals. The first, a recent discovery in Spain, is a fragment of a teenager’s diary. It reads oog.oog.oog and has been translated as ‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’.

‘[Dear diary, I feel] emotionally distant. [I wish I had my own cave]’

oog.oog.oog

The second text is either an exhaustive history of the region or simply the Neanderthal word for ‘antelope’, oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

 

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog.oog…

 

These findings suggest Neanderthals were just as culturally sophisticated as modern humans, but totally lacked an efficient method of communication. It has long been known that while Homo Sapiens’ culture developed rapidly, Neanderthals stagnated over thousands of years. Schmaltz hypothesizes that innovations simply would have taken too long to explain, as new words would have to be even longer chains of oog’s.

Schmaltz went on to speculate that the high-five traces its origins back to a borrowing from Proto-Neanderthal. “With each hand representing the name ‘Oog,’ slapping them together must have been used as a greeting. It truly was the original instant message.”

 

LINGUIST: A Non-Profit Service for Linguists

Dear Subscribers,

I came from Shanghai, China and I am so happy that I have joined the LINGUIST team over the past six years. I really appreciate the LINGUIST List for giving me this job opportunity. Right now I can support my family, raise my kid, and learn a lot of new things from different projects.

As a full time programmer for LINGUIST, I have been involved in many different projects. This year I am mainly involved in two projects: LEGO and EasyReg. For the LEGO project, we have uploaded 31 lexicons and we will upload more lexicons and more than 3000 word lists into our system. Then the user can search all the data in these lexicons and word lists through our faceted search facility. The EasyReg facility was launched a few months ago. The EasyReg system will help conference organizer to set up online registration system easily and let registrants submit and pay registration fee online through their customized registration system.

Also I help to maintain the publisher, finance and EasyAbs web sites.

LINGUIST is non-profit organization. It provides free service for all linguist users in the world. Your donations – even a small amount – will mean a lot for us. Your contribution will help us to continually run another year to provide more service for linguist users and gave us the chance to work here.

Please help us to donate at:

https://linguistlist.org/donation/donate/donate1.cfm

Thanks again for your continued support and donations!

Yours sincerely,
Li (Lily) Zheng
LINGUIST Programmer

Week 3 of Routledge’s Prize Giveaway! Donate Now!

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

It’s a new week, which means we have another Routledge giveaway to announce! Anyone who donates this week is eligible to win either the title of their choice from Routledge’s Handbooks in Applied Linguistics series, or a one year subscription to their preferred Linguistics journal! For more details, please visit the link below:

http://www.routledge.com/u/FundDrive14

But remember, you’re only eligible to win if you donate!

http://linguistlist.org/donation/

Want to make sure you walk away with some swag? The donate $35 or more to receive the premium of your choice!

http://linguistlist.org/fund-drive/2014/premiums.php

As always, good luck!

The LINGUIST List Crew

Making the Most of LINGUIST: Resources for Institutions, Conference Organizers, and Employers

As an active and esteemed member in your linguistics program or institution, you may wish to announce opportunities for enrollment and financial support for students, or you may wish to organize a conference. You may even wish to begin the hiring process to recruit a new faculty member. LINGUIST can help you save some time and effort in doing all of these things!

  • Programs and Institutions: If your school has not already been listed in our Institutions, registering in our Programs and Institutions area is an important step. People can align themselves to your institution, you can add degree and research programs relevant to linguistics, and people can name you as their host institution for their research and dissertations.
  • FYI: Submit your message here to announce a new program or a scholarship your school has to offer students.
  • Support: If you have fellowships or research assistantships available to support students through their degree, submit this information as a Support.

Is your organization or institution hosting a conference? LINGUIST has several services designed specifically with conference organization in mind.

  • Conferences: Announce your conference’s meeting description, call for papers, program and registration information.
  • Summer Schools: Announce your summer (or other time of the year) school session. No more confusion as to where summer schools (or specialized schools) should be classified.
  • EasyAbs: You can you this to organize your entire abstract submission and review process… for free!

If you’re looking for professional linguists for your Institution or Project, check out

Jobs: Submit a position to our concentrated readership of professional linguists. This announcement will remain active for 6 months, or until your position is filled.

Be sure to read our next letter in this series on special interest resources (such as social media, discussions, blogs, etc.)!

Featured Linguist: Barbara Citko

During our Fund Drive, we have been traveling to different areas of the world and introducing you to featured linguists in those regions. So today our new Featured Linguist is Barbara Citko from the University of Washington. If you are eager to learn how Barbara became a linguist, please read her story below.

Barbara Citko

How I Became a Linguist
by Barbara Citko

How did I become a linguist? I think I took a road many linguists take, which is via a study of a foreign language. In my case it was good old English, which I started studying when I was seven. And, as they say, the rest is history. This is how I got interested in crosslinguistic variation, and the idea that there are well-defined limits to this variation. Well, maybe this came a bit later, although I have always liked to think of myself as a precocious linguist.

I grew up in Gdynia, Poland during what I consider to be one of the most interesting periods in Poland’s history. Gdynia, like Gdańsk, perhaps its better known neighbor, also had a big shipyard, and these shipyards were places where the Solidarity movement started. Both of my parents were members of Solidarity; my father worked in the Gdynia shipyard. This meant that strikes, martial law, curfews were very close to home, not something you heard about on the news or learnt about from history books. Maybe this experience didn’t help me become a linguist, but it certainly shaped me as a person.

I went to an English high school and majored in English philology as an undergraduate in college (first at the University of Poznań and then University of Gdańsk, both in Poland). It was in Poznań where I first got exposed to Chomskyan linguistics. I still remember my first syntax course, pouring through Radford’s textbook and being utterly fascinated by the beauty and simplicity of Subjacency Principle. I know, I am dating myself here.

I came to the States in 1994 and got a PhD in linguistics from Stony Brook University in 2000. My dissertation was on free relatives, and I have been interested in what we might call non-canonical wh-constructions: across-the-board wh-questions (What did Peter write and Bill review?), questions with coordinated wh-pronouns (What and where did John sing?), multiple wh-questions (Where did John sing what?) and various types of relative clauses ever since. In my research, I tend to focus on Polish, my native language, hoping to contribute to our understanding of the syntax of Slavic languages and, more generally, to our understanding of which aspects of language are universal and which ones are not and why this might be the case.

Over the years I have been influenced and inspired by so many great linguists, all of whom would be impossible to name here. But I do want to acknowledge my first syntax teachers, Przemysław Tajsner and Jacek Witkoś from the University of Poznań, and my undergraduate advisor from the University of Gdańsk, Piotr Ruszkewicz, and thank all the faculty from Stony Brook University, in particular, Richard Larson, my dissertation advisor, for making graduate school such a wonderful and memorable experience!

After graduating from Stony Brook I spent one year as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Utah, one year at the University of Connecticut and two years at Brandeis University, before joining the Linguistics Department at the University of Washington in 2005, which is where I have been since. It goes without saying that I would not even have known about these positions without the Linguist List, let alone have applied for them, let alone have gotten any of them. I also wouldn’t have known about countless conferences, books, journals; all the things that help us keep up with the field. In other words, without the Linguist List I wouldn’t be the linguist that I am today. Thank you, guys, for everything you’re doing!!!

Barbara Citko