Featured Staff

Staff Letter: Everett Green

Everett Green

Hello, Fellow Linguists!

My name is Everett Green, and I am currently the general editor for the LINGUIST List. I am chiefly responsible for all of the lower traffic submission areas (i.e. FYI’s, Software, Media, Discussions, etc.) but since I am trained on almost all of the editorial areas (sans 3 or 4) I try to spend time helping out my colleagues with their tasks when the opportunity arises. Lately, I have been spending my time managing the fund drive posts so I can not thank those of you who have donated enough, especially in these particularly stressful times.

As some of my colleagues have mentioned, this job gives us a considerable amount of insight into the field of linguistics as a whole and since I have worked in almost all of the editorial areas in some capacity, I have gained a respectable overview of the field of linguistics. In particular the jobs and conference call submission areas showcase some very interesting research. However, I am a bit biased here as these are the two primary areas that I was responsible for in the past. The sampling of the research space that our job provides has been invaluable in helping me to determine my own research interests and, as another bonus, it is quite heartening to see some of the great research that all of you do.

Outside of the LINGUIST List, I am a dual PhD student in Computational Linguistics and Cognitive Science. Generally, I study neural networks (among other techniques) and how we can use these to create artificial agents (i.e. virtual agents, robots) that ground their understanding of language in the context of their environment as humans do in the real world. Lately, I have been studying a special type of neural network called a transformer network which was the network architecture behind the recent breakthrough language model, GPT-3 (explanation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_x9AwxfjxvE).

The opportunity to work with the faculty here at Indiana University, who have deep knowledge on the aforementioned topics, is not something that I take for granted. Without the support of the LINGUIST List, I would have gone deeply in debt to acquire the knowledge that I currently possess and more than likely would not have been able to be a part of the research community at all. So I cannot thank you all enough for your support. I only hope that I can repay the favor by contributing research that makes all of your lives healthier and happier. Thanks so much for taking time out of your busy day to read about me and I hope to keep assisting all of you in whatever way that I can here at the LINGUIST List.

Best wishes to all of you,
Everett

If you haven’t donated and you would like to, you can do so by visiting our donation website here: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

 

Staff Letter: Joshua Sims

Dear Friends of the LINGUIST List:

My name is Joshua Sims, and I’ve been the Systems Administrator at the LINGUIST List since January. I do the behind-the-scenes work of keeping site running. I’m here to update your email address, recover your password, edit post errors and generally work out any problem you encounter that our submission and request forms can’t cover. Since our offices closed in March, more than half of my tenure at the LINGUIST List has been remote. You could call this an interesting year to start working at the LINGUIST List.

I have focused my linguistic work on Mongolian and the languages of Central Asia. As an undergraduate, I started researching Mongolian phonology, tackling questions such as the interaction of palatalization and tongue root harmony in vowel quality. Indiana University was my top choice for graduate work because of the close partnership of the linguistics department with the Department of Central Eurasian Studies and the Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region.

However, I never could have come and studied here if not for the position I received at the LINGUIST List. Because of the work I have here, I have been able to take courses in Mongolian, Kyrgyz, Manchu and Old Turkic, and study phonology from excellent linguists working in exactly my areas of interest. If the LINGUIST List didn’t have the funds to employ students, then my studies would have remained forever casual endeavors. The LINGUIST list has been bringing opportunities to linguists for three decades now, just as it has opened doors to me.

Thank you to every one of you who reads our posts and visits our sites. Thank you even more to everyone who submits or follows up on the many job and publication opportunities we post. Thank you most of all to everyone who has donated to the fund drive, even so much as a dollar. I am so grateful for the support that provides for my education, and I know all my colleagues feel the same. We represent only part of a network of thousands of linguists the world over who have published, graduated or been employed because of a posting on the LINGUIST List. We all need you, and we all thank you for your continuing support.

If you are able to make a donation, please visit https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/ today. Thank you!

– Joshua Sims

Staff Letter: Jeremy Coburn

Dear LINGUIST Listers,

My name is Jeremy Coburn and I am the student moderator and editor for The LINGUIST List working on book announcements and book reviews. I have the pleasure of working with some of the most prominent publishers in the world to deliver publications on cutting-edge developments within the field of linguistics to you, our readers. My job is to ensure that the books we announce on LINGUIST List are current and relevant to you and your interests as a linguist by vetting the hundreds of publications which are submitted to us each month for announcement. This means that when you receive a book announcement from The LINGUIST List, you know that what is being advertised is hand-selected for our linguistic audience.

The LINGUIST List, and by extension the generous donations given by so many of you, allowed me to obtain a Master’s degree in General Linguistics from Indiana University, our host institution, last Spring without accruing any of the crushing student debt that affects most graduate students. Now, I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Linguistics at IU pursuing a PhD in Linguistics with a concentration on African languages and linguistics. Having lived in East Africa for several years, I developed a love for the linguistic diversity present in Africa and consequently focus my research on the description of languages of Tanzania. My doctoral dissertation research focuses on the phonetics and phonology of Hadza, an endangered language isolate spoken in north-central Tanzania. I am particularly interested in the acoustics and articulation of clicks in Hadza using instrumental methods, including 3D/4D ultrasound. I have been selected for the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) fellowship to conduct fieldwork in Tanzania with the Hadzabe beginning in Spring 2021.

I would like to thank you, our readers, for all that you do for me and my family. In addition to being a linguist, I am also a husband and father of two rambunctious children (4 & 2). Thanks to your donations, I am able to support my family while pursuing my post-graduate degree. When my wife and I began this crazy journey of graduate school, we had little more than the ambition to pursue a dream of studying the beautiful languages of East Africa and trying to help the world in some small way. We moved to Bloomington, Indiana from Utah without any job or source of funding to pay for my studies. We didn’t know how we would pay for anything. But now, because of your support and contributions, I have a GA-ship with the LINGUIST List which covers my tuition costs and gives me enough money to feed my growing family. Please continue to support LINGUIST List as much as you are able because it does make a significant difference in our lives. You can do that by donating to our fund drive at the following link: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Thank you again from Jeremy, Lynzie, Ryker, and Maiya!

Staff Letter: Sarah Robinson

Dear LINGUIST List readers,

My name is Sarah, and I’m on the Pubs Team–I manage journals, journal calls for papers, TOCs, summer schools, and dissertations. We may have met through email, or you may have read some of my blog posts about nerd stuff on the LL blog. I’m also cross-trained in jobs and conferences and can jump on those editorial areas if other editors are out for the day.

I’ve worked at LL for a couple years now, and it’s been an awesome opportunity. LL has been instrumental to my academic career–I came to my graduate program unfunded and tripled my student debt in less than a year. I got a graduate assistantship from LL in my second year and it saved me from having to drop out because of sheer financial pressure. What I mean to say is that LL is providing opportunities to graduate students like me who might otherwise have no way to participate in academia, and has been doing so for years. LL keeps grad students afloat and helps provide for the next generation of academics.

I earned my MA in General Linguistics in 2018 from Indiana University, Bloomington, LL’s host institution, and am now a member of the PhD program in the Linguistics Department at IU, as well as doubling in the Germanic Studies Department, while also working up a minor in cognitive science. Since starting my graduate program, I’ve been able to study Old Norse, Icelandic, Old High German, Old English, German, Gothic, ancient Germanic literature and philology, (can you tell I have a bit of a thing for historical linguistics and dead Germanic languages?), as well as branching out into Cognitive Science, in particular the intersections between cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis, and sociolinguistics. It’s a pretty broad range of topics, but the overlaps in subjects have made it possible for me to specialize in a really particular niche as well as building a strong background in a range of linguistic studies.

LL provides a specific and indispensable opportunity to its editors–since we interact with scholars all over the world in a huge range of specializations, and since our job involves functionally acting as a middle man for the fire-hose of academic literature and publications, we get a birds-eye-view of the trends in current linguistics in a wide range of specializations and subfields.

LL handles thousands of submissions and a gigantic amount of data day-to-day, and there’s only a handful of graduate students working diligently to keep our 30,000 subscribers up-to-date on linguistic publications, job opportunities, conferences where they can submit their research, and much more, as well as doing the hairy work of filtering predatory publishers and conferences that are likely to hurt academic careers more than help them. And it’s not just editors who work so hard to support the global linguistics community around here–keep an eye out for our WebDev team’s “fun facts” series on Tuesdays to learn more about all the services LL provides.

When you support the LINGUIST List, you support the mission the LINGUIST List stands for–the cause of creating a global linguistics community, a place to share knowledge and find resources–but you also support students like me, who wouldn’t otherwise be able to be part of it.

Thanks for donating!
Best regards,
Sarah

Staff Letter: Becca Morris

Dear LINGUIST List readers,

“Hej” everyone, my name is Becca Morris and I am the Managing Editor here at LINGUIST List (LL) and I am also responsible for posting careers, creating social media boosts, and all things finance related. We may have met via email, or you may remember my staff letters from previous years.

It has been two years since I started at LINGUIST List and it has truly been a wonderful experience and opportunity. I am now a third year PhD student in Computational Linguistics at Indiana University and I would not have been able to continue if I hadn’t gotten my graduate assistantship job at LL – I came to IU as an out-of-state and unfunded MA student. By employing graduate students, The LINGUIST List allows us to contribute to our field in an impactful way, while at the same time they are helping us tremendously by providing the means for us to continue our educations and support ourselves.

Since my staff letter last year, I have switched my area of research to parsing, specifically Dependency Parsing with a concentration on Swedish. I will be completing my qualifying exams this year and will then become a candidate.

I also had the opportunity to do a semester abroad in Sweden this Spring! Even though it got cut short because of Covid-19, it was a wonderful experience and I made life-long friends that are still in Sweden. I was also able to network with researchers who are also working on parsing Swedish, and I got to to learn more Swedish! It was such an amazing experience that I am hoping to do a post doc there after I graduate.

Working at LL has taught me many things, for example, how to make valuable connections with notable people in our field and how to become better at time management. These are valuable skills that I will use throughout my career. This job also allows the editors and programmers to see what is going on in our field and provides us the opportunity to contribute to academia in a meaningful way.

LINGUIST List provides our field with vital resources and we couldn’t do it without your support. When you support The LINGUIST List you are not just supporting the editors and the programmers, but also the linguistics community as a whole.

This year is LINGUIST List’s 30th anniversay and we could not have done it without your support, and we hope that we can continue to provide the community with linguistic resources.

Thank you again for all of your support, everyone here at LINGUIST List is forever grateful to all of you. If would like to help us to continue providing resources to the linguistic community please visit our fund drive page and donate.

Tack så mycket!

Sincerely,

Becca Morris
Managing Editor
Careers Editor
Invoicing Officer
LINGUIST List

Staff Letter: Lauren Perkins

Hello, fellow linguists!

My name is Lauren Perkins, and I am the student editor for the Calls and Conferences area of The LINGUIST List. It’s my job to make sure that each call for papers or conference announcement is formatted according to our standards and includes all the information that subscribers will need before posting them on our website. I’ve been able to ‘meet’ a few of you via email, and always enjoy interacting with my fellow linguists and helping you advertise your conferences and events.

I feel like I have one of the most fun jobs at LINGUIST List since it allows me a brief peek into the types of research that are going on in our field all over the world. As a relatively new PhD student, it’s really inspiring to have a job that continually exposes me to new languages, new questions, and new avenues of study in linguistics.

As I mentioned, I am beginning my second year in the General Linguistics PhD program at IU. I’m currently interested in syntax, psycholinguistics, and construction grammar. My latest research project concerns the syntactic phenomenon of sluice-stranding (also called ‘swiping’ or ‘swifting’) in English and whether or not it can be viewed as a type of ellipsis. I am interested in ways that we can connect current syntactic theory with developments in neuro- and psycholinguistics and cognitive science, hopefully providing a bridge between the theoretical and the functional.

In my spare time (what little of it I have), I love spending time with my husband, Sam, and our cat, B. We like relaxing at home and drinking tea, or having friends over for game nights. I also enjoy kickboxing, practicing calligraphy and embroidery, and reading novels.

I’m extremely thankful for my job at the LINGUIST List, and thankful for donors like you that make it possible. Not only does working at the LINGUIST List provide a fascinating insight into current linguistics research, as well as flexible hours (imperative for a graduate school schedule), but it also provides me with enormous financial peace of mind. When Sam and I moved to Indiana from Texas last year, we had just taken out a huge loan for my first semester. I had been dreaming of returning to school for my PhD for several years, and Sam fully supported me in that dream, but we knew we couldn’t afford to keep taking out loans like the one we’d just committed to. Thanks to LINGUIST List, I can now complete my program without taking out any more loans, and we are able to start chipping away at past students loans. Our goal is to be debt-free within the next few years, which would have been totally impossible without the LINGUIST List. Since my work can be done remotely, I was also able to continue my work despite the current crisis, which is a privilege I don’t take lightly.

So, I want to thank everyone for supporting the LINGUIST List for the past 30 years! We at LINGUIST List are honored to serve such a wonderful community of linguists, and so thankful for the impact that working at LINGUIST List has had on our academic experiences. We look forward to another 30+ years of service, and we trust that we can continue to rely on our faithful subscribers who make all of our work possible. If you enjoy the resources the LINGUIST List offers and are financially able, please consider donating. Thanks so much for taking the time to read my story, and I look forward to posting your upcoming conferences!

Staff Letter: Everett Green

Hello Linguist Listers,

I hope my message finds all of you well. This is Everett Green checking in. I’m the calls and conferences editor for the LINGUIST List. If you have sent a conference call, program or announcement through our website, it was almost certainly posted by me. I’m also responsible for editing submissions to FYI’s, Media, Software, Discussions, Queries and Summaries. This may seem like a disproportionate amount of work but these areas don’t receive quite as many submissions as Calls & Conferences, hence my being responsible for all of them at once. I have had very pleasant interactions with many of you in emails and I always enjoy helping top-notch researchers like yourselves in getting the word out about your conferences, calls for papers and other important pieces of information.

At the office.

Working on conferences gives me a very interesting snapshot of the kinds of work that people are doing within linguistic sub-fields and in interdisciplinary spaces. I must say that the sheer breadth and scope of the work being done is quite vast. So vast in fact, that a person could easily dedicate their life to studying the topics and questions addressed at a single, very specialized conference, not to mention any of the more broadly focused conferences which can cover countless numbers of topics. This bird’s eye view of the field of linguistics is an unofficial perk of the job since it has very much assisted me in deciding which area of research I would like to contribute to. Though I have not fully committed to a particular subject of study (there are so many interesting fields!), I have been able to narrow my preferences down in very meaningful ways thanks to my job here at the LINGUIST List.

Outside of the LINGUIST List, I am a dual PhD student in Computational Linguistics and Cognitive Science. I have currently been studying how artificial neural networks can be used for better natural language processing and how we can apply that language processing to give our computers a superior understanding of natural languages. Ideally, in the future, we would be able to interact optimally with our computers(or robots) through natural language alone. This wouldn’t just make things more convenient for the average computer user but it would also increase accessibility for those who cannot currently use computers due to disabilities.

Hopefully I’ll have more time for these one day…

In terms of recreation, I have many interests though most have been shelved in the pursuit of higher goals. The interests that have managed to survive the culling are music and video games which fit together quite well since music is integral to video game development. The latter subject actually has minor applications for my research as well. Before attending graduate school, I had done some recreational video game design with my friends and gained some useful programming skills in the process. As duolingo has shown, gamification of language acquisition is quite popular among the general public and I believe that it is another tool that can be leveraged to help researchers collect data and publish more robust studies when utilized carefully.

I will have worked at the LINGUIST List for two years come May and I can easily say that it is one of the best jobs that I have ever worked in. None of it would be possible without the donations that all of you provide us with and I sincerely thank all of you for your continued support of our work. I only hope that I can repay the favor by contributing research that makes all of your lives healthier and happier. If you haven’t donated and you would like to, you can find our donation page here. Thanks so much for taking time out of your busy day to read about me and I hope to keep assisting all of you in whatever way that I can here at the LINGUIST List.

お元気で
Everett Green

Staff Letter: Jeremy Coburn

Dear LINGUIST Listers,

My name is Jeremy Coburn and I am the student moderator and editor for The LINGUIST List working on book announcements and review issues. I have the pleasure of working with some of the most prominent publishers in the world, e.g. Cambridge and Oxford University Presses, etc., to deliver publications on cutting-edge developments within the field of linguistics to you, our readers. My job is to ensure that the books we announce on LINGUIST List are current and relevant to you and your interests as a linguist by vetting the hundreds of publications which are submitted to us each month for announcement. This means that when you receive a book announcement from The LINGUIST List, you know that what is being advertised is hand-selected for our linguistic audience.

On the reviews end of my work, I have the opportunity to work for and with many of you in connecting you with publishers to review their publications, thus further ensuring that the publications which pass through our site are of the highest quality we can offer. This gives LINGUIST List the unique opportunity to connect and unite linguists from across the globe in an open forum of peer review and collaboration to shape the field of linguistics, effectively creating a global community of cooperation which is largely absent from many other fields of scientific inquiry. And in that, the field of linguistics and speakers of language (humankind) benefits immensely. I am honored to assist, in my small way, in facilitating such intradisciplinary coordination.


Beyond my work at LINGUIST List, I am a second-year doctoral student at Indiana University pursuing a PhD in Linguistics with a concentration on African languages and linguistics. Having lived in East Africa for several years, I have developed a love for the linguistic diversity present in Africa and consequently focus my research on the description of underdocumented and/or underresourced languages, particularly in Tanzania. My current research is with the Hadzabe people of north-central Tanzania. I am a serious language enthusiast (my wife would say obsessive) and I particularly enjoy phonology and morphology.

Speaking of my family, my wonderful wife Lynzie and I will celebrate our five-year wedding anniversary this year and have two fantastic children. Our oldest, Ryker, is 3 years old and he recently got a little sister, Maiya, who is now nearing her first birthday. My kids are the best and it is so much fun to get to see Ryker as he is acquiring language. There are many linguistic geek-out moments each day listening to him speak.

I would like to thank you, our readers, for all that you do for me and my family. Many of you regularly donate to the LINGUIST List, which is wholly funded by your contributions, and thus are the reason why I have a Graduate Assistantship. When Lynzie and I began this crazy journey of graduate school, we had little more than the ambition to pursue a dream of studying the beautiful languages of East Africa and trying to help the world in some small way. We moved to Bloomington, Indiana from Utah without any job or source of funding to pay for my studies. We didn’t know how we would pay for anything. But now, because of your support and contributions, I have a GA-ship with the LINGUIST List which covers my tuition costs and gives me enough money to feed my growing family. Please continue to support LINGUIST List as much as you are able because it does make a significant difference in our lives. You can do that by donating to our fund drive.

Thank you again from Jeremy, Lynzie, Ryker and Maiya!

Staff Letter: Becca Morris

Dear LINGUIST List readers,

Here I am showing off a new haircut.

My name is Becca Morris and I am the Managing Editor here at LINGUIST List (LL) and I am also responsible for Finances, posting jobs, and creating social media boosts. We may have met via email, or you may remember my staff letter from last year.

It has been almost a year since I started at LINGUIST List and it has truly been a wonderful experience and opportunity. I am now a second year PhD student in Computational Linguistics at Indiana University and I would not have been able to continue if I hadn’t gotten my graduate assistantship job at LL – I came to IU as an out-of-state unfunded MA student. By employing graduate students The LINGUIST List is providing us the means to contribute to our field in an impactful way, while at the same time they are helping us tremendously.

Since my staff letter last year, I have become a second year PhD student and I am now working on Universal Dependencies and Dependency Parsing for Hakha Chin (as mentioned in my blog post) at IU. I am also minoring in Informatics. I expect to finish my qualifying exams by the end of Fall 2019 and then become a candidate. In my spare time, which there is not a lot of as a graduate student, I am teaching myself Swedish and would like to work with this language in the future.

I also like to go to concerts in the small amount of spare time that I have. Coheed and Cambria is my favorite band and this was my ninth time seeing them live.

LINGUIST List has not only allowed me to excel academically but also personally. This past year has been a rather transformative year for me and I don’t think I would have been able to do it had it not been for LL supporting me. I was able to find myself, personally and academically, this year and I will forever be grateful to The LINGUIST List for helping me along this journey.

Working at LL has taught me many things, for example, how to make valuable connections with notable people in our field and how to become better at time management and these are valuable skills that I will use throughout my career. This job also allows the editors and programmers to see what is going on in our field and provides us the opportunity to contribute to academia in a meaningful way.

LINGUIST List provides our field with vital resources and we couldn’t do it without your support. When you support The LINGUIST List you are not just supporting the editors and the programmers but also the linguistics community as a whole. Next year LL will turn 30 and we couldn’t have done it without your support.

 

Thank you again for all of your support, everyone here at LINGUIST List is forever grateful to all of you. If would like to help us to continue providing resources to the linguistic community please visit our fund drive page and donate.

Tack så mycket!

Sincerely,
Becca Morris
Managing Editor
Jobs Editor
Finances

Staff Letter: Sarah Robinson

Dear LINGUIST List readers,

My name is Sarah, and I’m on the Pubs Team–I manage journals, journal calls for papers, TOCs, summer schools, academic papers, and dissertations. We may have met through email, or you may have read some of my blog posts about nerd stuff on the LL blog. You may even recognize that introduction from my letter last year (sorry, I still have the same job.) I’m also cross-trained in jobs and conferences and can jump on those editorial areas if other editors are out for the day.

This is my (joyless as usual) face. Guest-starring: Lir the cat!

I’ve worked at the LINGUIST List (henceforth: LL) for a couple years now, and it’s been an awesome opportunity. LL has been instrumental to my academic career in the form of funding–I came to my graduate program unfunded and tripled my student debt in less than a year. I got a graduate assistantship from LL in my second year and it basically saved me from having to drop out because of sheer financial pressure. What I mean to say is that LL is providing opportunities to graduate students like me who might otherwise have no way to participate in academia, and has been doing so for years.

I earned my MA last year in General Linguistics from Indiana University, Bloomington, LL’s host institution, and am now a member of the PhD program in the Linguistics Department at IU, as well as doubling in the Germanic Studies Department. Since starting my graduate program, I’ve been able to study Old Norse, Icelandic, Old High German, Old English, German, Gothic, ancient Germanic literature and philology, (can you tell I have a bit of a thing for historical linguistics and dead Germanic languages?), as well as branching out into Cognitive Science, in particular the intersections between cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis, and sociolinguistics. It’s a pretty broad range of topics, but the overlaps in subjects have made it possible for me to specialize in a really particular niche as well as building a strong background in a range of linguistic studies.

It is pronounced /li:ɹ/. He enjoys sleeping in unusual places.

LL provides a specific and indispensable opportunity to its editors–since we interact with scholars all over the world in a huge range of specializations, and since our job involves functionally acting as a middle man for the fire-hose of academic literature and publications, we get a birds-eye-view of the trends in current linguistics in a wide range of specializations and subfields.

LL handles thousands of submissions and a gigantic amount of data day-to-day, and there’s only a handful of graduate students working diligently to keep our 30,000 subscribers up-to-date on linguistic publications, job opportunities, conferences where they can submit their research, and much more, as well as doing the hairy work of filtering predatory publishers and conferences that are likely to hurt academic careers more than help them. And it’s not just editors who work so hard to support the global linguistics community around here–keep an eye out for our WebDev team’s “fun facts” series on Tuesdays to learn more about all the services LL provides.

You might be wondering: “is she trying to solicit support for an awesome non-profit? Or just looking for an opportunity to show us her cat?” but he is a very good cat, okay? Please donate.

When you support the LINGUIST List, you support the mission the LINGUIST List stands for–the cause of creating a global linguistics community, a place to share knowledge and find resources–but you also support students like me, who wouldn’t otherwise be able to be part of it.

Thanks for donating!
Best regards,
Sarah