Fund Drive

Buy LINGUIST List a Bottle of Wine!

Like many hardworking academics, we at the LINGUIST List sometimes like to wind down with a nice, pre-dinner glass of red wine. This Fund Drive, we invite you to donate the equivalent of a mid-priced bottle of wine ($15 or any amount) as an investment in our mood and heart health during these stressful times 🙂 (just kidding!)

In all seriousness, your $15 will go towards keeping LINGUIST List up and running so that we can continue connecting the linguistics community through services like job and program listings, conference and journal calls for papers, TOC’s, and more!

Donations are tax-deductible (in the U.S.) and can be made here:
https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/.

You can also set up a recurring gift here:
https://www.myiu.org/recurring-gift?sc=AG21GANIUFO4GNWETF25M by typing “Linguist List” in the ‘search more funds’ field.

Many thanks to those who have already donated. LINGUIST List is able to exist because of supporters like you!

Take a Fellow Linguist Out to Dinner!

If you could choose anyone, living or dead, to have dinner with, who would it be? Would it be a fellow linguist?

Good news: if the linguist in question is living, you can probably connect with them through the LINGUIST List! Whether you wish to attend a conference they’re giving a keynote at, or to read their newest publication, LINGUIST List has you covered. So, we invite you to donate the price of a nice dinner ($20 or any amount) to help LINGUIST List continue to connect linguists with like-minded researchers, educators, and innovators across the world.

Donations are tax-deductible (in the U.S.) and can be made here:
https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/.

You can also set up a recurring gift here:
https://www.myiu.org/recurring-gift?sc=AG21GANIUFO4GNWETF25M by typing “Linguist List” in the ‘search more funds’ field.

Thank you so much to all those who have already contributed. You mean the world to us!

$30 for 30 Years

Dear Linguist Listers,

As our regular readers well know by now, this year is LINGUIST List’s 30th anniversary! In honor of the Fund Drive, instead of 30 candles, we’d like to ask for 30 dollars…or pounds, euros, yen, pesos, wons, or any other currency you’re able to give!

If you appreciate LINGUIST List’s services and believe in our mission to connect the global linguistics community through the free exchange of information and resources, we invite you to show your support through a gift of $30 or any amount! This will help keep us up and running to serve the linguistics community for years to come.

Donations are tax-deductible (in the U.S.) and can be made here:
https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/. You can also set up a recurring gift here:
https://www.myiu.org/recurring-gift?sc=AG21GANIUFO4GNWETF25M by typing “Linguist List” in the ‘search more funds’ field.

Our deepest gratitude to all those who have already contributed. We appreciate your support, especially during a year like 2020!

All the best,
– The LL Team

Fund Drive Lottery Giveaway Blitz: Day 2

Loyal and lovely LINGUIST Listers,

Day 2 of our GIVEAWAY BLITZ is upon us! Thank you to all who donated yesterday and congratulations to yesterday’s big winner!

Over the next few days, we will have more special single-day lotteries. This means, all those who donate on the specified date will have a chance to win wonderful prizes which were graciously provided by our supporting publishers. Donations need not be large; a donation of just $2 (less than a cup of Hot Cocoa) from all of our users would easily launch us past our fund drive goal.

The rules are simple:
One donation = one entry into the drawing. To donate, click this link: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Donors who donate between now and 5:00 pm EST on Sunday, November 15 will be entered in today’s drawing. And here is the prize that could be yours!!!

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From Cambridge University Press:

A one year, online only subscription to the following journal:

Language Variation and Change

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/language-variation-and-change

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What an exciting opportunity to win an excellent publication for yourself! These giveaways are just a small way for us to say thank you to all of our donors and supporters. Without donations from our users, LINGUIST List will simply be unable to continue to unite our discipline by facilitating the compilation and dissemination of linguistically-relevant books, journals, reviews, job postings, and conference posting, just to name of few of our numerous services you rely upon. Every little bit helps!

Thanks and good luck!

With gratitude,
– Your LINGUIST List team

Fund Drive Lottery Giveaway Blitz: Day 1

All LINGUIST Listers,

As our 2020 Fund Drive starts to wind to a close, we have an EXCITING giveaway! Over the next few days, we will have special single-day lotteries. This means, all those who donate on the specified date will have a chance to win wonderful prizes which were graciously provided by our supporting publishers. Donations need not be large; a donation of just $2 (less than a cup of Hot Cocoa) from all of our users would easily launch us past our fund drive goal.

The rules are simple:
One donation = one entry into the drawing. To donate, click this link: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Donors who donate between now and 5:00 pm EST on Saturday, November 14 will be entered in today’s drawing.
And here is the prize that could be yours!!!

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From Wiley:

The Concise Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics
Edited by Carol A. Chapelle
https://www.wiley.com/en-us/The+Concise+Encyclopedia+of+Applied+Linguistics-p-9781119147374

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What an exciting opportunity to win an excellent publication for yourself! These giveaways are just a small way for us to say thank you to all of our donors and supporters. Without donations from our users, LINGUIST List will simply be unable to continue to unite our discipline by facilitating the compilation and dissemination of linguistically-relevant books, journals, reviews, job postings, and conference posting, just to name of few of our numerous services you rely upon. Every little bit helps!

Thanks and good luck!

With gratitude,
– Your LINGUIST List team

Staff Letter: Joshua Sims

Dear Friends of the LINGUIST List:

My name is Joshua Sims, and I’ve been the Systems Administrator at the LINGUIST List since January. I do the behind-the-scenes work of keeping site running. I’m here to update your email address, recover your password, edit post errors and generally work out any problem you encounter that our submission and request forms can’t cover. Since our offices closed in March, more than half of my tenure at the LINGUIST List has been remote. You could call this an interesting year to start working at the LINGUIST List.

I have focused my linguistic work on Mongolian and the languages of Central Asia. As an undergraduate, I started researching Mongolian phonology, tackling questions such as the interaction of palatalization and tongue root harmony in vowel quality. Indiana University was my top choice for graduate work because of the close partnership of the linguistics department with the Department of Central Eurasian Studies and the Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region.

However, I never could have come and studied here if not for the position I received at the LINGUIST List. Because of the work I have here, I have been able to take courses in Mongolian, Kyrgyz, Manchu and Old Turkic, and study phonology from excellent linguists working in exactly my areas of interest. If the LINGUIST List didn’t have the funds to employ students, then my studies would have remained forever casual endeavors. The LINGUIST list has been bringing opportunities to linguists for three decades now, just as it has opened doors to me.

Thank you to every one of you who reads our posts and visits our sites. Thank you even more to everyone who submits or follows up on the many job and publication opportunities we post. Thank you most of all to everyone who has donated to the fund drive, even so much as a dollar. I am so grateful for the support that provides for my education, and I know all my colleagues feel the same. We represent only part of a network of thousands of linguists the world over who have published, graduated or been employed because of a posting on the LINGUIST List. We all need you, and we all thank you for your continuing support.

If you are able to make a donation, please visit https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/ today. Thank you!

– Joshua Sims

Challenge Update: Week 9

Hello LINGUIST Listers!

We’re here with our week 9 Challenges Updates. Since last week we have gone up 5.36% which pushes us just over our halfway mark. We have now reached 50.5% of our goal!

For the Subfield Challenge we had an upset for first place. It looks like Syntax wanted their spot back and they are now in the lead with $2,655. Sociolinguistics is in second place with $2,560. These two are really close! We have Phonology in third place with $2,330.32 in donations. The competition between these three subfields has been neck-and-neck throughout this year’s Fund Drive.

For the top two spots in the University Challenge we haven’t seen an update, but Indiana University is holding on strong to their first place spot with $1,385 in donations from 8 donors. Wayne State University is still in second place with $1,100 in donations from 3 donors. For third place, we do see an update. The University of South Carolina is still in third place, but we see an increase in money donated and donors. They now have $960 in donations and 13 donors.

We see a rather large increase in the number of donors from North America for the Regional Challenge. Since our last update 11 more people have updated bringing them to 141 total and keeping them in first place. Europe is still in second place with 102 donors which is also a large increase since last week which was 86 donors. Asia is in third place with 14 donors.

We’ve seen quite a lot of activity from our donors this past week. We at LL greatly appreciate all of your support. Tune in next week to see another update!

…and if you would like to donate, you can do so by visiting our donation page here: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Sincerely,
– The LL Team

An Easy Way to Help the LINGUIST List

Dear linguists,

If you use Amazon, you can generate a donation to the LINGUIST List at no cost to yourself. 
 
Its that easy: Shop for gifts at smile.amazon.com/ch/45-4211155  and Amazon will  donate 0.5% of your eligible purchase value at no cost to you. LINGUIST List has received this calendar year approx. $700 as of the beginning of  November. You could increase this number easily at no cost to yourself. Simply choose us as your favorite charity!
 
On your first visit to smile.amazon.com, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations. As LINGUIST List is just an internet creature, we use Elinguistics Foundation (a registered US 501(c)(3) public charitable organization with the legal address in Grosse Pointe, Michigan) to help us collect donations via Amazon Smile.  AmazonSmile will occasionally contact you about donation amounts disbursed to your chosen charity or about the program.

 

Make a difference this holiday. Choose us as your favorite charity!

…and of course, if you would like to make a direct donation you can do so by visiting our fund drive website here: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Featured Linguist: Colin Phillips

This week, we are pleased to bring you the work of Professor Colin Phillips for our Featured Linguist!

When the LINGUIST editors invited me to write a piece for this year’s 30th anniversary fund drive, I was curious to dig into the LINGUIST archives. LINGUIST started shortly after I started in the field. Like, really shortly. So LINGUIST and me were finding our feet right around the same time, in late 1990.

A quick scan of the first 6 months of LINGUIST turned up this message:

Date: Thur, 04 Apr 91
Subject: Our 1000th Subscriber
If we were not an academic organization, and therefore had some money, we might hand out a prize for this. As it is, all we have to offer is congratulations to Colin Phillips ([email protected]), who is our 1000th subscriber.

I was an exchange student in linguistics at the University of Rochester at the time, taking a year to find some direction in my life. I was definitely finding that direction.

Finding linguistics felt like a kind of destiny for me. In high school in the UK I learned lots of languages and studied mathematics. They didn’t offer psychology, but I would have signed up in a heartbeat if I could. At age 16 my math teacher, who everybody considered a bit nutty, told me there was this guy called Chomsky who I should look into. Living in a farming town, pre-internet, I didn’t know how to follow up on that prescient tip. In college, at Oxford University, I followed a literature path, and focused on medieval German. It was the comparative psychology aspect that interested me the most when learning about the medieval world.

I’m not entirely sure how I got to be in Rochester. There was an exchange scholarship, and I was told that nobody else had applied. I checked a US map in a local bookstore, and it looked like Rochester was just outside New York City. I had no grasp of the scale of the US.

Within two weeks of arriving in Rochester I was smitten. I was surrounded by energetic students and faculty from many different countries who were arguing about language using ideas from multiple fields: linguistics, psychology, computer science, philosophy. They cared deeply about each others’ answers. They were so well integrated that it was hard to tell which students were from which field. It was pure good luck that I had stumbled into this incredibly vibrant pocket of language science. After my years as an isolated medievalist, it was intoxicating. I wanted more. By the time I signed up for LINGUIST List, I was wrapping up a life-changing year in Rochester, and preparing to move to Cambridge, MA to join the graduate program at MIT.

A scan of the first 6 months of LINGUIST turns up some surprises.

There is a post from Andrea Zukowski. At the time we were both graduate students in Rochester. She was in Psychology. We have now been married almost 25 years, and our child is a college freshman at the U of Maryland. Andrea was posting about a conference she was organizing in Rochester. It was the first time the CUNY Sentence Processing Conference was held outside New York City. I wasn’t a psycholinguist at the time, but I have now attended that conference every year since 1995. Not only because it was how I met my wife.

The early issues contain a lot of back-and-forth discussions among well-known linguists, such as a long-running discussion about cognitive linguistics involving George Lakoff, Vicki Fromkin and many others. And since websites were not yet a thing, there are surprisingly many posts asking, “Hey, does anybody have contact information for so-and-so?”

In May 1991 there is a post from John Lawler about the LINGUIST List archive that he was curating, pointing out that the “spectacular growth” of the list over its first few months had led to the archive file reaching 2MB in size.

Innocent times indeed. And so it’s little wonder that fields like psycholinguistics were less accessible to linguists at the time, too.

I went to MIT planning to be a semanticist. Clearly, that didn’t work out. I didn’t intend to become a psycholinguist. Linguistics students at MIT were not doing that kind of work. That was typical of most programs at the time, with a couple of exceptions, such as UMass. If you wanted to do psycholinguistics, you went to a psychology department. By another stroke of luck, my first couple of years in Cambridge coincided with some new grants that aimed to create bridges between fields.

Alec Marantz, David Poeppel and I started exploring MEG research on speech perception in 1993. On our first trip to New York City to collect some data we missed the last flight back to Boston. We were sleeping on the floor of La Guardia airport at 4am.

My dissertation work grew out of another accident. I was embarrassingly delinquent on some class projects. One night I was lying awake worrying, when I realized that I could kill two birds with one stone. A paper on incremental structure building that I owed Ted Gibson for a psycholinguistics class could do double duty as a paper on syntactic constituency that I owed David Pesetsky. The path that I started along that night is one that I have been following ever since, though in ways that I could never have predicted.

When I started my first faculty job, at the University of Delaware in 1997, I was hired as a hybrid syntactician and psycholinguist. I had limited lab experience and was learning on the job. UD was relatively unusual for the time in hiring a psycholinguist into a linguistics department.

In those days a linguist could feel like an outlier in psycholinguistics conferences. I remember feeling particularly despondent after the 1999 CUNY Conference in New York City. The conference was hosted by the CUNY Linguistics Department, but linguists were a small and marginalized group at the conference.

The role of psycholinguistics in linguistics has changed dramatically during my time in the field.

Psycholinguistics used to be something that you would go to the psychology department to do. Nowadays it is an entirely normal part of a linguistics department.

Experimental research used to be exotic in linguistics departments. Now it’s routine. Of course, it’s easier now than it used to be. (Not that today’s psycholinguists are slackers.)

Computational research used to be largely out of reach for linguists. Now it’s more normal. There was a time when I was technically on the cutting edge for a linguist. Nowadays my students leave me in the dust with their computational skills.

The growth of psycholinguistics within linguistics has been remarkable. It is no longer a “Cinderella” field. I no longer feel like an outlier at the conferences that I regularly attend.

Some things have changed faster, such as faculty and student interests, and the range of research methods used. Some things have changed more slowly, such as curricula and publishing practices. Linguistics curricula are gradually moving away from a traditional canon that marginalizes psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics publishing remains dominated by psychologists. Currently I’m happy to be part of a team that is preparing to launch the new journal Glossa: Psycholinguistics that aims to sit squarely between fields.

A surprise to me has been the rise in popularity of adult psycholinguistics among linguists. When I started in the field language acquisition was taken more seriously by linguists. But the balance of interests shifted at some point. I hope to see a resurgence of interest in learning issues among linguists.

What future directions do I predict or hope for psycholinguistics?

It’s too easy to predict more data using more diverse tools from a wider range of languages. Of course, this is almost certain to happen. Bringing in evidence from more languages is a very good thing. But more data won’t necessarily get us better questions or answers.

There’s no doubt that computational tools will play an increasingly important role in psycholinguistics. I hope that this will be accompanied by more widespread computational thinking. Nowadays we have relatively easy access to complex computational models, and to powerful toolboxes for statistical analyses. There’s a bit of an arms race. But I would place my bets on the most useful insights coming from relatively simple models. We often learn the most from computational models that take us a little beyond what we can do with thought experiments alone. If the model then yields surprises, we can figure out the cause of the surprise. At that point we understand our own hypotheses better, and we can then do better thought experiments.

The COVID-19 pandemic has clearly limited the kinds of data that we can gather as psycholinguists. Right now we have no clear sense of when we will be able to do eye-tracking or EEG experiments again. But the pandemic has also launched a time of remarkable creativity in data collection. As I write this, we are planning a Japanese speech production experiment. The speech data will be collected via the internet, taking just a couple of days, while we are mostly isolated in Maryland. This was unimaginable twenty years ago. The new possibilities for online data collection could advance cross linguistic research in psycholinguistics more than anything else in recent decades.

I am generally happy with where psycholinguistics is as a field currently. There are many talented young people who combine linguistic expertise with sophisticated experimental and computational skills. They are asking questions about mental linguistic computation that simply weren’t on our radar when I was cutting my teeth.

I feel really fortunate that a series of accidents led to me finding myself in the middle of this thriving field.

Thanks for reading and if you want to donate to the LINGUIST List, you can do so here: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

All the best,
– The LL Team

Status Update: End of Week 8

Hello LINGUIST Listers,

We hope that you are all doing well. Thank you for keeping up with us during a time when there are many other events to draw one’s attention. This week we made it to 48.24%. We are very close to the 50% mark and need $705.09 to reach it. If you have not already donated and you are on the fence, this is one of those opportunities for you to help us reach a big checkpoint. Remember that any amount helps. A big thank you to all of you who have already supported us and in case you missed it, your donations are tax deductible: https://blog.linguistlist.org/fund-drive/fund-drive-donation-information/

If you are interested in contributing to the fund drive, you can do so by visiting our donation page here: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/

We hope the rest of your weekend goes well!

All the best,
– The LL Team