Projects

Projects hosted by The LINGUIST List

A behind-the-scenes peek at our new website…

Lwin, Katha, Paige and Clare

The past few months, we have seen great progress in our new website, thanks to the hard work of our web development team. This summer, we hosted two interns, Katha and Paige, who formed the core of our team, spending many hours making our new website functional and beautiful. With assistance from Lwin, our programmer, and input from Clare, one of our student editors, these two have brought us even closer to the launch of a new and improved website that we are sure our readers will enjoy.

While Paige will be continuing her work on the new website this fall, Katha has reached the end of her internship at the LINGUIST List, and will be returning to Germany soon to finish her bachelor’s thesis. To say goodbye and celebrate the end of our “summer” web development phase, we would like to share with you some of the progress the team has made!

Our new home page features custom graphics for our various services, book announcements from Cambridge University Press, and an RSS feed with the latest issues of the LINGUIST List. Here you’ll always be able to see what’s new, front and center.

The new browse/search form will allow you to search and filter through the latest announcements in each area, making all of our issues easily accessible.

The new submission form is dynamic, easily accessed for any area, and user-friendly for all areas!

As you may have seen for yourself, the new password reset feature is already active. If you forget your password when logging in, you can now use this page to automatically reset your password within minutes.

We wanted to thank you, our readers and supporters, for your donations this year that made it possible for us to support our summer interns and fund this development. We still have some features to develop and corners to polish, but we hope to soon be able to announce the launch of some of these features, so stay tuned!

– Your LINGUIST List Team

 

Meet Jacob Heredos, Featured Staff of the week!

Jacob started at the LINGUIST List as an intern last summer, and once the summer ended, decided to stay on as an atypical staff member! He’s also the Master Mind behind the Geoling Treasure hunts you’ve been trying to solve (by the way, if you haven’t tried this week’s yet, you should really read this post: https://blog.linguistlist.org/uncategorized/enjoy-a-weekend-getaway-all-from-behind-your-keyboard/, there are prizes to win!)

You can find out about where Jacob comes from here: http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/pages/JacobHeredos/ and read more about what he has to say to you below:

Dear Users of the LINGUIST List,

My name is Jacob. I started working with the LINGUIST List as an intern last summer, less than a week after finishing my BA in Anthropology, International Studies, and Spanish here at Indiana University.

I suppose my place in the LINGUIST List is a bit unorthodox in a few ways. First, you may have noticed that my background is not exactly in Linguistics (though I did minor in it). Second, I have no ties to the posting and editing that make up the core of the List, instead working on a number of our other projects and lending a hand wherever help is needed. Third, while our staff is mostly made up of MA and PhD students, I am no student at all, working only at the LINGUIST List and as a research assistant.

It has been a privilege to work at the LINGUIST List, and I think that my unusual position here has given me a unique perspective on the work that we do. As I moved more and more toward linguistics later in my studies, the LINGUIST List impressed me with its scope and utility. In every other discipline that I have involved myself in, none has anything even close to the central hub that the worldwide linguistics community has in the LINGUIST List. The List makes the world of linguistics, whether in industry or academia, infinitely more accessible to students and young professionals, and its value cannot be overstated.

The LINGUIST List has served the global linguistics community for nearly three decades, and I hope that it can continue to do so for decades to come. In my short time here, I have seen the monumental time and resources necessary to run the List, and the hard work of linguistics students and faculty who balance their own studies, teaching, and research alongside it.

Your generosity is what keeps us serving the community. Thank you for your support, and please donate to allow us to continue to serve you.

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/

Sincerely,

Jacob

Enjoy a weekend getaway… all from behind your keyboard!

Dear Linguist Listers,

Happy Friday! It’s the weekend, and you know what that means… another edition of the Great LINGUIST Treasure Hunt!

This game involves traveling the (virtual) globe and testing your linguistics wits. The winner will receive a sweet prize, so don’t miss out!

To play, you’ll need to go to GeoLing (http://geoling.linguistlist.org/). To find the buttons you’ll need to navigate the globe, click on the menu button in the upper left hand corner. You can select and unselect Local Events, Jobs, Conferences, and more to view them on the map. Game clues will be found in different locations on different kinds of pins.

To get you started, here’s your first clue:

Featured Linguist San San Hnin Tun has taught on three continents, but she taught at one university for over two decades. You will find your first clue there!

kan kaung ba zay—may the best linguist win!

-Your LL Team

PS: You will need this valuable hint to complete the race: after you’ve found the first clue, which will take you beyond Geoling, you will need to return to Geoling, with your answer from clue 2 to find clue 3!

LINGUIST List Internships 2017

The LINGUIST List invites undergraduate and graduate students as well as particularly motivated senior high school students to the 2017 summer internship program.

Interns at LINGUIST List have the opportunity to participate in the daily operations of the LINGUIST List, including editing submissions to the LINGUIST List and correspondence with linguists.

Apart from that interns will have the opportunity to work under the supervision of local or visiting faculty at The LINGUIST List on concrete research projects related to language and STEM sub-disciplines, language documentation, as well as engineering of software solutions and algorithms, mathematical concepts and methods, and technologies related to speech and language data.

Depending on individual interests or skills interns can get involved in the following LINGUIST List related projects for a certain proportion of their work time:

  • GeoLing: A web-application that maps LINGUIST List events, institutions, resources on a GIS system for mobile devices and access
  • Voice interface: Development of dialogs and speech interfaces for use with Amazon Echo/Alexa, Google Home, Cortana, etc. to provide LINGUIST List information over these voice systems/interfaces, develop new linguistic “skills” and extend existing ones
  • Improvement of the new LINGUIST List website and content, applications like Ask-a-Ling, and new services and applications

 

Interns will get an opportunity to also work with:

For more information on the specific projects read about them on the specific pages and visit our “Get Involved” site.

 

Thierry Declerck visiting the LINGUIST List

Thierry Declerck

Thierry Declerck

We were happy to have Thierry Declerck from the DFKI here in Bloomington over the last weeks. He writes:

“I have been visiting the Indiana University on the occasion of a workshop on Corpora in the Digital Humanities that I co-organised with Sandra Kübler.  At the same time I was very happy to follow an invitation by Damir Cavar to visit the office of the LINGUIST List and to discuss issues related to the topics of the workshop, especially in the field of low-resourced languages, and how to make resources for such languages available and more visible. Damir made an impressive presentation of the use and adaptation of recent speech technology products (e.g. Amazon Echo/Alexa, Google Home) for accessing information available at the LINGUIST List (including information about conferences, workshops, jobs, or notes on language resources and technologies).

Thanks for hosting me and for the discussions we also had in the days following the workshop and my first visit at the LINGUIST List offices and hoping to continue the exchanges.”

Thierry Declerck

 

The LINGUIST List Team at the LSA Annual Meeting 2017 in Austin, Texas

The LINGUIST List team at the booth at LSA Annual Meeting in Austin, demonstrating GeoLing, Alexa’s Flash Briefing LINGUIST List module, and many other new projects…

 

 

This is probably the first time that LINGUIST List posts have been edited and approved on the highway while driving from Bloomington, IN, to Austin, TX.

At the conference:

 

 

GeoLing shows linguistic events and institutions on a global map

The LINGUIST List has added a new service to its set of web applications: GeoLing

GeoLing allows you to submit announcements of local linguistic events. See for details the HOWTO page of GeoLing.

It also allows you to view all active conference, job, and summer school announcements that are submitted to LINGUIST List on a global map.

In addition to these exciting new functionalities, GeoLing also displays on a global map all linguistic institutions, programs, organizations, even office addresses that were submitted to LINGUIST List.

GeoLing can link to your institutional online calendar and read all local events from it automatically so that you do not have to update the events on GeoLing manually. GeoLing also understands emails with attached addresses in the vCards format, iCalendar or vCal event data submitted to it via email from your favorite contact management software or app, or your PIM or organizer. You will find more details on the HOWTO pages of GeoLing.

LINGUIST List can host online calendars for your institution and link them to GeoLing. Please let us know, if you are interested in this service.

The interface will allow you in the next version to display selected events. For example, you should be able to display all events that are related to “Optimality Theory”, or to “Syntax” of “Slavic languages”. You should be able to find all “theoretical syntax” jobs, or jobs related to “Natural Language Processing”, “Speech Recognition”, “Pragmatics”, “Translation”. There is a limited search facility implemented already. We are working on more improvements.
The displayed information about the events will allow you soon to “add the event to my calendar” or “add the address to my address book” on mobile devices like tablets or smart phones. We are working on that.

 

We hope you like this new service.

Your LINGUIST List Team

 

Huge steps have been taken in LINGUIST List projects – Thank you, 2016 Summer Interns!

The Fall breeze brought the beginning of a new semester along with it, and a new season for our team of highly motivated Summer Interns at LINGUIST List, who (for the most part) just left us for the continuation of their linguistics endeavors. We are very grateful for their hard work and the priceless contribution they brought to multiple LINGUIST List projects, including GORILLA, MultiTree, LL-Map and GeoLing! These projects have all been started some time ago, and they were brought much closer to completion this summer. We are now very excited to let them tell you what they did over the last few months.

 

1) GORILLA

GORILLA is an exciting project currently being built. The goal of this project is to create a unified source of annotated corpora for languages around the world, with an emphasis on endangered and under-resourced languages. So Eun, Julian, Simon-Pierre, Clare and Will hugely contributed to this project by working on some novel speech corpora for Korean, German, and Kinyarwanda, and by revamping and annotating the AHEYM speech corpus for Yiddish.

Clare

“This summer, I helped to develop the Yiddish Speech Corpus: I transcribed, transliterated, and annotated Yiddish speech and developed corpus metadata. I clarecoordinated with Will and So Eun, and together we annotated over 5 hours of media for the corpus, including interviews, poetry and audio books.”

So Eun

“Over the course of the Linguist List internship, I have worked on collecting and producing speech corpora on the Yiddish and Korean SoEunlanguages. For the Korean corpus, I gathered texts in Korean from non-copy right restricted online sources, made recordings of said texts, and annotated each recording using ELAN. As to the Yiddish corpus, I helped with annotating the Yiddish recordings available at Indiana University’s Archives of Historical and Ethnographic Yiddish Memories (AHEYM) by segmenting audio files as well as converting and copying Yiddish (orthographic and YIVO/romanized) transcriptions onto the ELAN annotations.”

JulianJulian

“While interning at LINGUIST List this summer, I was involved in one main project, and several smaller ones as well. I was told about the speech corpus I would be working on, and shown how to use the program necessary for it. I started off making audio recordings, and then transcribing them to text using ELAN. This took up the majority of my time interning here, but was very useful. After I had completed the transcriptions, I was given some smaller tasks, such as improving LINGUIST List’s website by cleaning up old links. I feel that my time interning here was useful and well spent, and has helped expand my skill set”

 

2) GeoLing, LL-Map and MultiTree

These three projects are some valuable tools that have been in the makings for quite some time, here at LINGUIST List. Thanks to some of our 2016 interns, these tools are now improved!

MultiTree is a digital library of scholarly hypotheses about language relationships and subgroupings, organized in a searchable database with a fancy web interface. Noah, Chloe and Arjuna spent the summer working on the structure of this useful webinterface, providing you with the new and improved MultiTree!

MultiTree interact with the LL-MAP Project, a geolinguistic database which provides users with a fully functional Geographical Information System (GIS) through which linguistic data – including subgrouping information – can be viewed in its geographical context. Jacob lead this project, assisted by Chloe.

Geoling is also an interactive map service, but with a different goal. It displays linguistics information around the world on a map: jobs, conferences, internships, and for the first time on LINGUIST List: local events. Lewis spent much time and effort reorganizing the data for this project, and with the help of Noah and Arjuna they were able to implement it to the website!

Jacob

Jacob“I have spent the summer working on the LL-MAP project, which had been offline for several years. I began by identifying and correcting issues with the geometry and attribute data of the maps in our PostGIS database and KML files to allow them to display properly in viewers like QGIS, Google Earth, and OpenLayers. I also corrected the styles corresponding to the maps, according to recommendations by Jacob Henry, in order to show the colors, labels, and other visual aspects as they appear in the original source. Once the maps had been uploaded into Geoserver, I went through them to identify specific problems and fixed display issues with several dozen maps. Finally, I contributed along with several other interns to the new LL-MAP viewer. I would like to thank Lwin Moe and Damir Cavar for their help at every step of the process, and Damir and Malgosia Cavar for the opportunity to take part in this project.”

Chloe

IMG_9534“As a summer intern at the Linguist List, I worked on improving the MultiTree and LL-MAP sites. Before I started, I had played around with the old and new MultiTree but didn’t know how the trees were generated. With some training in Django and D3 data visualizations, I was able to get behind the scenes of MultiTree and start exploring different tree views using the data from the Linguist List. Because of the variety of visualization options, I learned to put myself in the user’s shoes and to decide what features to prioritize in order for the site to be more helpful to the linguist community.

After MultiTree, I helped with the LL-MAP team on their project. Working on the new LL-MAP was a dynamic process because we constantly adjusted our tasks based on user feedback. The result that came out was an elegant viewer page that provides as much information as possible in a simple and organized way.

One thing I learned from my internship experience is the difference between a classroom assignment and a real project. For both MultiTree and LL-MAP, we had a lot of freedom deciding what to work on as a team as opposed to being assigned specific tasks, with the goal to make the site more informative and easier to use. I’m glad to have gained the experience of collaborating with teammates, and learning to solve issues creatively and efficiently.”

 

We sincerely enjoyed having these burgeoning linguists join our team, and we even have the pleasure of having Jacob and Clare stay on at LINGUIST List after the end of their internship! Thanks to the devoted work of the 2016 LINGUIST List summer interns, some novel and valuable language resources have now been created: their contribution goes beyond the limits of LINGUIST List, and is truly a contribution to the Linguistics community around the world. We now invite you all to enjoy these new tools that have been developed over the years by many different hands, and most recently by the LINGUIST List 2016 Interns crew!

A new year, a new LINGUIST List crew: introducing the 2016-2017 GAs!

Dear Readers,

With the waning of the hot season here in Indiana, and the wrapping up of some of the summer projects at LINGUIST List (you’ll get to read more exciting news about this soon!), and after having said good bye to our deeply missed predecessors, it is time to start a new semester with a new LINGUIST List crew!

You have already encountered most of us, and we’ve actually already been working here for some time, but here is the official introduction of us new GAs at LINGUIST List. Glad to meet you all!

Yue

Yue Chen

Yue is a new graduate assistant at the LINGUIST List. She comes from Chengdu, China. She is currently a second year M.A./Ph.D. student in Computational Linguistics here at Indiana University. Her academic interests are natural language processing, machine learning and recently, parsing. In daily life, she enjoys cooking, baking, hiking, crocheting and reading.

Ken

Kenneth Steimel

Kenneth Steimel is a student editor at LINGUIST List. St. Louis and Columbia Missouri were his home before moving to Bloomington. He works primarily with conferences and calls for papers at LINGUIST List. However, he also edits ask-a-linguist, summaries, FAQ, queries and discussions. His research, outside of LINGUIST List, is concerned with documenting African languages. He is specifically interested in developing computational tools and corpora for the languages he studies. In his free time, he also enjoys roasting coffee, geeking out over cars and backpacking.

mike

Michael Czerniakowsky

Mike is a student editor here at LINGUIST List, where he works primarily on Books and Publications, while pursuing his MS in Computational Linguistics at Indiana University. In his free time he enjoys reading, crossword puzzles, and trivia nights.

Amandacroped

Amanda Foster

Amanda started working at LINGUIST List in October 2015. She is now the Jobs and Supports Editor, as well as the editor for Journal related posts, Software announcements, and Programs and Institutions. She is originally from a small town in Northern France, but has also spent some time in Paris and in Ireland before coming to IU to pursue an MA in General Linguistics. She is passionate about the study and documentation of under-resourced and endangered languages. When she is not entertaining herself with language puzzles, she loves reading, hiking, and discovering the nature and culture around Bloomington!

clare

Clare Harshey

Clare feels lucky to have been a summer intern for the LINGUIST List this year, and even luckier to be able to work here for the school year as well! This summer, she focused on the Yiddish Speech Corpus, part of the GORILLA project. She’s continuing work on the corpus this fall; she’s also in training as an editor for the Reviews, Books, Jobs and Support sections of the LINGUIST List. She is at IU to pursue her MS in Computational Linguistics, and is grateful for the opportunity to do work that builds on her education and her passion for this field. Outside of linguistics, she enjoys music, reading and exploring Bloomington with her dog.

We are excited to have a role to play in connecting the Linguistics community around the world. We’ll be in touch soon (and now, you can even associate a face to these editing emails you receive!)

Linguistically,

The LINGUIST List Editors