Fund Drive Lottery Week 3

Week 3 of the annual LINGUIST List Fund Drive Lottery!

This year, our supporting publishers have been extraordinarily generous and are offering up more prizes than ever before. Last week alone we gave away 8 prizes of journal subscriptions and books. This week we are coming at you with even more to give away.

To enter into this week’s drawing, donate to our fund drive sometime between now and Friday, October 8. Prizes change each week so check back every week to see what’s up for grabs.

**One donation = one entry into the drawing. To donate, click this link: https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/**

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THIS WEEK’S PRIZES:

From Cambridge University Press:

Jones — Viral Discourse (https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/applied-linguistics-and-second-language-acquisition/viral-discourse?format=PB)

Description: This Element consists of ten short pieces written by prominent discourse analysts in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Each piece focuses on a different aspect of the pandemic, from the debate over wearing face masks to the metaphors used by politicians and journalists in different countries to talk about the virus. Each of the pieces also makes use of a different approach to analysing discourse (e.g. Critical Discourse Analysis, Genre Analysis, Corpus Assisted Discourse Analysis) and demonstrates how that approach can be applied to a small set of data. The aim of the Element is to show how the range of tools available to discourse analysts can be brought to bear on a pressing, ‘real-world’ problem, and how discourse analysis can contribute to formulating ‘real-world’ solutions to the problem.

McIntosh, Mendoza-Denton — Language in the Trump Era (https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/sociolinguistics/language-trump-era-scandals-and-emergencies?format=PB)

Description: Early in his campaign, Donald Trump boasted that ‘I know words. I have the best words’, yet despite these assurances his speech style has sown conflict even as it has powered his meteoric rise. If the Trump era feels like a political crisis to many, it is also a linguistic one. Trump has repeatedly alarmed people around the world, while exciting his fan-base with his unprecedented rhetorical style, shock-tweeting, and weaponized words. Using many detailed examples, this fascinating and highly topical book reveals how Trump’s rallying cries, boasts, accusations, and mockery enlist many of his supporters into his alternate reality. From Trump’s relationship to the truth, to his use of gesture, to the anti-immigrant tenor of his language, it illuminates the less obvious mechanisms by which language in the Trump era has widened divisions along lines of class, gender, race, international relations, and even the sense of truth itself.

Sandoval, Denham — Thinking like a Linguist (https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/english-language-and-linguistics-general-interest/thinking-linguist-introduction-science-language?format=PB)

Description: This is an engaging introduction to the study of language for undergraduate or beginning graduate students, aimed especially at those who would like to continue further linguistic study. It introduces students to analytical thinking about language, but goes beyond existing texts to show what it means to think like a scientist about language, through the exploration of data and interactive problem sets. A key feature of this text is its flexibility. With its focus on foundational areas of linguistics and scientific analysis, it can be used in a variety of course types, with instructors using it alongside other information or texts as appropriate for their own courses of study. The text can also serve as a supplementary text in other related fields (Speech and Hearing Sciences, Psychology, Education, Computer Science, Anthropology, and others) to help learners in these areas better understand how linguists think about and work with language data. No prerequisites are necessary. While each chapter often references content from the others, the three central chapters on sound, structure, and meaning, may be used in any order.

From Wiley:

The Handbook of Psycholinguistics by Eva M. Fernández (Editor), Helen Smith Cairns (Editor) – 978-1-119-09652-8

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The giveaways have only just begun! We have many more exciting offers coming your way this Fund Drive. Our supporting publishers share our vision and aim to bring linguists around the world together via the LINGUIST List.

We thank you for letting us be a part of your life and for your continued support! Every dollar donated is deeply appreciated.

With gratitude,

– Your LINGUIST List team

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